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Hey Guest! Are you any good at cooking? Got a favourite recipe that you love to cook or bring out to impress that special someone? Why not share it! A new forum called The Burrow has opened and it's all about homemaking!

Culinary Ask a Chef: Or Zombie explains Cooking

Discussion in 'The Burrow' started by Zombie, Aug 25, 2017.

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  1. Jon

    Jon The Demon Mayor Admin DLP Supporter

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    Best Soup?

    Mine is a vegetarian one.

    Starts with a mirepoix of carrot, cellery, onion and capsicum, followed by a can of crushed tomatos + thyme and rosemary, basic vegetable stock and then extra in the form of sweet potato and blackbeans as it cooks. (plus a splash of red wine and soy sauce for a bit of acidity and umami.)
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2017
  2. Story Content: Instructional food Shows
    Zombie

    Zombie John Waynes Teeth Prestige DLP Supporter

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    Alton Brown is a great resource. I've actually met him before in GA. Great guy. He has a lot of genuinely useful advice.

    Whoever you enjoy watching is who I would say watch. In particular, I enjoy America's Test Kitchen, Cooks Country, and Good Eats, and Molto Mario.

    I use YouTube a lot when it comes to unfamiliar cuisine. I don't particularly watch any one person but usually they are known for what they cook.

    Italian would be Mario Batali
    Baja would he Bobby Flay
    Sushi, Japanese etc would be
    Masaharu Morimoto
    Mexican is Rick Bayless

    It varies. Usually if it's something new I will cook it a hundred times until I feel like I understand it. Other chefs in the profession are a great outside resource, or just someone who cooks the food.

    @Joe I'll get you a response when I'm less drunk and less high.
     
  3. deyas

    deyas DA Member

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    Thanks for the speedy response. Don't know if you're familiar with him, but Kenji writes the Food Lab column on Serious Eats. Odds are, I'd say, if you're a fan of Good Eats (as I have been since I was a kid), you'll like his column.
     
  4. Story Content: Steak Cooking
    Zombie

    Zombie John Waynes Teeth Prestige DLP Supporter

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    I will reference something I made earlier first:

    Middle finger and thumb is Medium-rare. When cooking a steak, don't be afraid to touch the meat. Use the hand guide above so you don't have to cut it open and let all the juices out. I've outright wanted to slap people before because they cut a piece of meat open to see how well its done. Its a great way to tell, but you have other senses that can aid you in this endeavor.

    Also, if you're wanting medium rare, you're going to pull it off the heat when its pointer finger and thumb and let it rest for at least 15 minutes. Any cook will tell you that beef in particular continues to cook because it internalizes the heat. So the trick to getting perfectly done steaks is pulling it when before you think its done and letting it rest.

    Here are some video's. One method I like is Cooking a steak on Coals.
    If you have one of those coal chimneys, make sure your steak will fit the inner diameter, load the top with coals, let that fucker get good and hot, and rest it down on top of your steak. Its like using a salamander broiler. Pretty much 2 min on each side, and you get a steak that comes out medium rare, wish a awesome crusty exterior.

    Use extreme caution when fucking around with heat like that though, this is more for everyone v. just you. Cooking is fun, as long as you're cooking safe.

    You can also make a bed of coals in a grill, and throw on some flank steak. Cook for about the same amount of time. Flank is cheap. But taste great if you cook and cut it right, which its grain is long, so you're going to want to cut into it and go against the grain, not with. Otherwise it will just be large chewy chunks.



    Personally, when I cook steak, I use the pan seared, oven finish method. Its something that is easy to control and if you're paying attention not hard to fuck up. Make some herb butter and put that on top of it, or some spicy cheese as a topping. This isn't really sauce, this is adding flavor to the steak, if you need sauce for a steak, then you're doing it wrong.

    However if you want a awesome sauce to dip your steak in.
    Worcestershire, a bit of brown sugar, only a bit. Salt, pepper, a dark beer, about half a pint. Garlic flake, red pepper flake, butter, and the renderings from your steak.

    Let that cook down until thick. It makes a great sauce.

    I'm a fan of long soaks in marinade before I cook on the grill.
    I also like griddle fried steaks, but not all of us are lucky enough to have a commercial griddle in their home kitchen. So if you don't have one, you can use one of those small George Foreman's to the same affect. Trick again is high heat, attention to time, and then finish.

    One thing I want to say before I end this post, I'll add more to this later. There are tons of different ways to cook steak. I just threw out a couple quick ones, but I'll look into my bag of tricks for some different unique methods later and come back to you.

    Finally, The first rule of cooking a steak is DON'T MOVE/LIFT steak once you've put it in the pan at high heat. You're looking for a sear no matter what. If you do move it, you're going to ruin a good piece of meat by turning it to gray dish water.
     
  5. Story Content: Best Soup
    Zombie

    Zombie John Waynes Teeth Prestige DLP Supporter

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    Sorry @Jon didn't even realize that your post was a question. I read it as statement of fact that the soup you described is the best soup, haha.

    • 2 tablespoons olive oil
      2 pounds lean top round, trimmed and cut into 1-inch cubes
    • 2 large sweet onions, diced
    • 2 cups large chunks of celery
    • 4 large carrots, peeled and cut into large rounds
    • 1 pound crimini mushrooms, sliced
    • 2 tablespoons minced garlic
    • 2 cups dry red wine
    • 4 large tomatoes, chopped
    • 1 1/2 pounds red potatoes cut into 1-inch chunks
    • 1 tablespoon dried basil
    • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
    • 1 teaspoon dried marjoram
    • 1/2 teaspoon dried sage
    • 1 quart beef stock

    My favorite soup is more of a stew.

    You're going to start with our olive oil and meat. If you're incorporating meat into a soup, especially chunks of it, cook it first. The bits it puts in the bottom of the pan adds great flavor and helps with thickening the sauce. Also the char on the meat is a nice contrast. You're going to cook the meat first, do it in batches so your skillet doesn't get too cold. Let it rest after you've browned all sides.

    Chop onion, celery, and carrots into the beef drippings and cook until soft. You'll stagger these because they each have different cook times. I'd start with your carrot first because it will take the longest to soften. Then onion and celery next. You'll know when the onion is done when its translucent. You're looking for clear, not brown. Caramelized onions are great, but not what you're going for in this recipe.

    Add your mushroom, cook a little, and then add in your garlic. Always add garlic as close to the end of your base mixture as possible. Yes, you want to cook it to knock the raw taste off it, but you don't' want it burnt. Burnt garlic is sad garlic.

    In your skillet kick all your other veg to the side and make a space in the middle of the pan, throw the garlic in. Let it heat up, and then incorporate it into the rest of the vegetable. I'd go with a mince on this. A slice is okay, but people always worry about overpowering their food.



    Mario Batali on Minced v Sliced
    This entire episode is good, so feel free to watch all of it.

    Now that all the other stuff is cooking, pour in red wine. Like I said before, cheap shit works just as well as expensive. Scrap up the brown bits on the bottom of the pan from cooking the meat and veg. That's the flavor. Use a wooden spoon, because only a dumbasses uses a metal spoon on a metal pan :)

    Let that reduce until most of the alcohol in the wine has cooked off and the sauce is starting to get thick.

    You're going to want about 2 cans of tomatoes for this. I prefer crushed, but chopped is fine too. I usually use whole canned tomatoes and then break them up into the meal, but you're looking for a bit of tomato in each bite, as well as that flavor. San Marzano gets a lot of shit for being not as good as they say they are. But honestly, when I used canned anything, these are the best.

    Wash your potatoes, and rough chop them. Leave the skins on. You can peel them if you want, but the skins add a great earthy flavor into the stew that makes it 100 times more filling.

    Return beef to skillet with potatoes, basil, thyme, marjoram, and sage. Pour beef stock and tomato sauce, which I know it says sauce, but I use paste, over the mixture. I love the taste of tomato paste. It's just super concentrated tomato flavor. Bring the liquid to a simmer.

    Reduce heat to low and simmer until the beef is very tender and the sauce is thick, 4 to 6 hours.



    • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter
    • 1 shallot, sliced thin
    • 4 sprigs fresh thyme
    • 4 ¼ cups water
    • 2 pounds sweet potatoes, peeled, halved lengthwise, and sliced 1/4 inch thick, 1/4 of peels reserved
    • 1 tablespoon packed brown sugar
    • ½ teaspoon cider vinegar
    • Salt and pepper
    • Minced fresh chives

    I got this recipe off of America's Test Kitchen. Someone asked me earlier what, if anything that I subscribe to in regards to outside resources, America's Test Kitchen is a great show for Southern, and non-traditional style cooking. Very instructional, and takes time to illustrate the best way to go about doing a recipe.

    In a large sauce pan at medium heat, melt butter, add in shallot and thyme, cook the shallot sorta like you would an oven. You're looking for soft, not brown. So it will be translucent. Add your water, increase the heat and bring to a simmer. Once at a simmer, remove the pot from the heat and add in your cubed sweet potatoes. Make sure your cubes are consistent because that will ensure even cooking.

    Let it rest for 20 minutes, uncovered.

    Put pan back on heat and bring it to a simmer. Add in your sugar, vinegar, and your salt and pepper at this point. Reduce heat, and cook potatoes until they're soft. Shoot for about 10 minutes, maybe longer, depending on how big your chunks are.

    America's Test Kitchen calls for a actual sprig of thyme. If you don't have that in your market, get a piece of cheesecloth and put in your thyme during the initial cook so that it draws the flavors out of it. And then discard before you blend. You're looking for the essence of the flavor, not the shit sticking between your teeth.

    Now to blend. Add a bit of the cooking water to a blend along with the sweet potato. Do it in batches because the steam will cause your blender to explode. Don't believe me, try it. :) You're going to blend until smooth, about 60 seconds max, you don't want to introduce too much air into it.

    Put that in to the pan, rinse and repeat until you've blended all your potatoes.

    Bring the mixture on the stove top back up to a simmer, because it taste best hot.

    Plate with either heavy cream, or sour cream and chive. Bit of salt and pepper to your personal taste.

    Additionally, and I didn't include this, the recipe in the book says to add in a bit of the peel from the sweet potato. Like 1/4 to the entirety of all the chunked potato. It makes it taste earthy ( like dirt) but it's a complimentary taste. You don't have to do this obviously, which is why I didn't include it. But it does make for a nice twist on a basic recipe.

    I love soup. I think in an earlier post I referenced a acorn squash soup done in the same manner as the sweet potato. They're fucking great, it's all about texture and consistency.

    You can do a tomato soup this way too. It beats anything you might eat from a can.


    Now that that's done. people reading this:

    I'm open for more questions. If you have any questions, or would like me to be more specific on a given topic, let me know.
     
  6. Xiph0

    Xiph0 Administrator Admin

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    For the people asking for cheap college grub, I'm just going to throw in that pasta (particularly rotini or similar) and bechamel sauce is pretty cheap and easy to make. You just melt butter in a pan, add some flour, cook it down a little, then stir in milk until all the flour is blended in. You can season it any way you want (I usually did garlic + basil) and you can always put it in the refrigerator and then microwave it + add some more milk. My first apartment in undergrad all ate that way for weeks on end.
     
  7. Zerg_Lurker

    Zerg_Lurker Unspeakable DLP Supporter

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    Following the college grub line of thought, and sort of an open question:

    What do you make on a regular/frequent basis, and what do you like for more balanced nutrition, as opposed to energy dense starch-based meals?
     
  8. Skykes

    Skykes Minister of Magic DLP Supporter

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    I worked for three restaurants, a Korean place, Spin Toronto and Stout Irish Pub. The Korean restaurant was really interesting, they have some serious discipline and dedication, as well as the best knife skills I saw out of around 15 cooks I worked with. Thanks for your insight into the food- arancini do have a long prep time compared to other dishes which can be done very quickly with 3-5 ingredients and some spices.
     
  9. Zombie

    Zombie John Waynes Teeth Prestige DLP Supporter

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    Frequently, I eat a lot of fish. I eat fish and rice of some sort at least 4 out of 7 days of the week. Its quick, and its filling.
    A healthy option would be steamed, I add vegetable on the side. I like to broil up some broccoli crowns on the side with my fish and my rice.
    I also like just raw fish, mixed with some lemon, salt and pepper, toss that in a container and shake it up. Its kinda like poke, but its not. Its just acidic cooked fish.

    My favorite rice and fish dish is Poke.

    • 1 pound raw ahi tuna, cut into 1/2-in. cubes
    • 3 tablespoons reduced-sodium soy sauce
    • 1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil
    • 1 teaspoon Asian chili oil
    • 2 tablespoons ponzu sauce
    • 1 garlic clove, minced
    • 1 green onion, sliced diagonally
    • 2 tablespoons roughly chopped cilantro leaves
    • 1 teaspoon toasted sesame seeds

    This recipe is simple enough. You can keep it cheap by getting a cheaper cut of fish. Any kind of red fish, or snapper will do. If you buy it whole and filay it yourself, its even cheaper still. Remove the sesame seed because those are about 10 dollars an ounce in a commercial market. At least where I live. Green onion is 98 cent a bunch.
    Sesame oil is 2.50 for a large container of it.
    Soy sauce is pretty cheap too, believe its 2.25 for the atypical bottle of it from the market.
    Garlic is literally 10 cents a head.
    Your rice, I don't know about you guys, but when I buy rice I get the 50 pound bags off the bottom shelf, or the commodity aisle because that's how much rice I use typically.


    Trick here is to go for fresh. All fresh, because its going to be raw. And you don't want a cooked flavor overpowering a raw flavor.

    You can cook your rice in a rice cooker, people talk shit about these things, but if you want perfectly cooked rice, get one and try it. Its the best thing ever. Much easier than trying to eyeball that shit. Al dente pasta is good, al dente rice is not so good. :) For those that don't know what al dente means, or even care, means too the tooth. Its that feeling of pasta right before its fully cooked, so that it remains firm. Nothing worse than soupy, soft pasta in a soupy sauce. Unless you're a baby that is.


    I eat about 8 times a day because I have zero body fat, and I'm losing weight just sitting here typing this to you. So, usually a protein, a veg, and a starch or minus the starch sometimes. Is what I eat the most of. I like soups, but outside of making a soup, I don't eat potatoes unless they're baked, and even then only rarely.

    My meal schedule is like this:

    Make egg dish in the morning(or since I've started hating egg dishes) I make poke. I cook a pot of rice up, and make a large bowl of the fish up and chill it because it only gets better with age.
    My mornings start around 4am.
    By 6am, I'm eating again. Another bowl of poke, maybe some coffee this time. (You can make an interesting sauce out of coffee)
    By 8am I'm eating again. Another bowl of poke, but then I begin prep for the evening meals.
    Take a break until 12, and then I start eating again. Poke, and a nibble of whatever I'm cooking.
    This morning for example I've got a dinner party to prep for, so I'm going traditional Mexican. Have pork knuckles, frijoles con tocino, mole, ACP (arroz con pollo), a metric fuck ton of tomato rice ( this is brown rice, with a can of tomato paste mixed into it), about 8 different types of meat (beef, pork, chicken, fish, in different styles)
    And tomales.

    So for my own future meals, I'll be eating tomales and probably some ACP. Which is just chicken and rice.

    I'd say the closest thing I have to a balanced and cheap meal, mostly because you can buy eggs really cheap, would be a frittata of some sort.

    Dice some peppers, onions, and whatever else vegetable you want, whisk up some eggs and cheese, with a splash of milk because you want the eggs dense, but not too dense. The milk will help lighten it up. Cook in a pan on medium heat with some butter, until it stops moving.

    You can leave it kinda runny if you want, or just when the middle is the only thing still moving, you're going to let it sit for a minute, and then pull it because when you take it off the stove top it will still be cooking the eggs. People don't know how often they ruin eggs by overcooking them, it makes me cry.

    I would consider for college people to eat something that has some weight to it. Rice, beans, potatoes. They're all cheap. Cook them simple. Xiph0 had a great idea about the white sauce.

    Or you can make your own stocks by rendering animal bones in a pot, and then adding flour to make flavored gravy.

    I'll add some more in a bit.
     
  10. Legacy

    Legacy Unspeakable DLP Supporter

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    What would you say to someone who is on the fence about jumping full into cooking. I've been working as a line cook for years, I've done some management, basically it's how I have paid my way through university. Now that I'm just about done school I keep being torn about what to do going forward. Food is what I go to as my first hobby and my way to relax. I feel comfortable in a kitchen and restaurant environment and I know I can make a life in it, it just means giving up on old plans for my life.

    Yes this is a fairly lost person asking for life advice on the internet from someone who is named zombie. Yes I can see the irony.
     
  11. Story Content: To be a Chef or Not to be a Chef
    Zombie

    Zombie John Waynes Teeth Prestige DLP Supporter

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    I've been in the resturant game for 15+ years.

    Don't look back.

    Being a Chef is something that you're either good at or you're not.
    You're a line cook, so you know what the struggle is like, getting plating right, presenting, speed, etc. Now add, scheduling, menu planning, ingredient sourcing, premise leasing, and overhead.

    If you can't budget, then you will be fucked. If you can't make a decent menu that caters to your localities taste, then your fucked. You can't be a niche chef that does french-japanese-russo style fusion and expect everyone in your town to enjoy that.

    Do not ever operate a buffet. You never make money. Ever.

    Management of a restaurant, all of your line cooks, on top of other responsibilities of being a chef is different than just managing the other line cooks. The Food industry is super competitive. An already established business loses nothing cutting its own menu prices to run you out of business, and they will do it, just because they don't want you encroaching on your territory.

    Like I said before, serve to your locality, not what you find interesting. But, and this is a large one. Be able to maintain an identity for what you do, and do it well. A chef is a fine balance between artist and civil servant. You have to make the people happy before you yourself is truly happy. Drawing enjoyment from cooking, and having it as a hobby =/= managing, owning, or being the head chef at a restaurant.


    When you commit to being a Chef. Always seek to better yourself. Never feel like you've reached a point where you think you're good. Because believe me, some self-entitled food writer, or other cunt with a smart phone and a yelp account can tank your place in a heartbeat.

    Funny Anecdote: I once ran a place, where a customer tried to tell me that my food was raw, that I was a terrible Chef, and that I was feeding poison to the other customers in the room. Caused a scene, threw their water glass down, and demanded a refund.

    While they were in the restaurant, they were yelping about my establishment (the Yelp review has since been removed, as well as the review page for the business). I essentially told them that if I had to tell them how to eat my food, as well as feed it to them, then my restaurant was not for them. That they wouldn't receive a refund, because it was on service rendered. If they weren't happy with the meal, then tough break.

    If the review, or their aggression had been legitimate then it would not have bothered me that much. But they had made reservations weeks in advance, had very specific request, so I knew that things were not going to go well.

    They were mad they were paying 150 bucks a plate, and didn't know fuck all about portioning, or course layout, or what the general atmosphere of my establishment was.

    So, handle your shit. Be able to take criticism. Be able to improve, and never stop learning new techniques. Don't try and paint yourself into a corner with some overly niche menu. Cater to your locals. Don't shoot yourself in the food by blowing your overhead.

    Start small, handle everything food wise. Hire someone to manage your books if you have no money sense.

    Order a week ahead. Know your ingredients, and where to source the best ones.

    Don't look back. Being a Chef is something that will consume you. You either are one, or you are not. And those who are not let their business eat them alive.
     
  12. Story Content: Investment
    T3t

    T3t Purple Beast of DLP Prestige DLP Supporter

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    To add on to Zombie's response:

    This depends a lot on where you're located and what kind of restaurant you plan to run (in terms of cuisine, price-point, etc). In Los Angeles, a lot of the new higher-end restaurants are funded by investors with deep pockets, almost as a system of patronage for their favorite chefs. If you decided to enter that market you'd be competing with people who can afford to run in the red for a while, which is a bad idea. Of course sticking to the cheaper stuff has its own drawbacks, so... find a niche. In LA the most recent example of that was Fried Chicken - Howlin' Rays exploded onto the scene with Nashville-style hot chicken and did it so much better than everybody else that people are standing in line for 2-3 hours just to get some. There are a bunch of imitators but none of them are as good, so none of them have the lines. Quality and consistency will be recognized.

    Also, in general, restaurants are a terrible venture from an expected value perspective. If you can find an investor it's definitely a better idea to use somebody else's money than your own if all you care about is actually running a restaurant. Stick your money into an index fund if you want returns.
     
  13. Legacy

    Legacy Unspeakable DLP Supporter

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    Thank you very much zombie. It sounds weird to say but I pulled your message out when talking with my mother about this. She's someone that's pushed me towards this for longer than I ever considered it an option. I couldn't stop thinking about this and grinning so that might be my answer.

    Continuing on with the earlier bit, would you recommend enrolling in culinary school or not?
     
  14. Story Content: Is School Worth it?
    Zombie

    Zombie John Waynes Teeth Prestige DLP Supporter

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    Yes, and no. Depending on where you live at you may have a nice culinary school in your area.
    I went to culinary school at the Art Institute in GA. Its a decent program. I finished it in about two years. However, I learned more by apprenticing with someone that had been cooking all their life.

    School is great for teaching you knife skills, if you're lacking. How to cook at a certain pace, how to prep your meals, and they teach menu construction and execution. But like most degrees you don't learn what being a Chef is truly like until you've got your own place and you're having to feed 300+ people a night.

    I take some follow up courses at the learning annex. Even with all the experience I have, I take extra courses that teach you basic, and advanced skills. Most of them are advertised as beginner, intermediate, and advanced.

    Culinary school, you learn the history of the food, which is great if you want to know the story about an ingredient, or a dish. You cook meals that are traditional, and that no one serves in a restaurant. Its mostly for teaching you the process and you do it until you get it right.

    So I would say yes, school is worth it if you're lacking experience in certain aspects. It also looks good if you're wanting to curry favor with a master. They usually want to take you in and break you of all the bad habits they teach you in school, as well as teach you how to innovate.

    When I took classes, I felt like everything we did was formulaic and without inspiration. You prepared this meal this way, not because it tasted better, but because it taught you something, much like doing an easier math problem that has all the precursors to an advanced math problem.

    I know some culinary programs are competitive, so if you're seeking to go to one of the big schools like CIA , or Cordon Bleu which are all about the culinary arts, then you're looking at paying a premium, as well as getting your dick stepped on by someone else trying to take your place.

    At the same time, I would also say no, school isn't worth it, if -- and only if you have a large food scene in your area. You're more likely to get brought on, probably not as a Chef, but as a line cook or a sous chef. I have taken on , in the past, several people that had no prior experience other than being a food enthusiast and an at home cook. It's all about how well you innovate, your drive, and your desire to complete something. When there are a lot of restaurants that need bodies, it creates a vacuum. Either it gets filled by people that already know how to cook, or they are more likely to take a chance on someone that's always there, and can learn.

    When I first started out as a dishwasher, I never thought I'd be more than that. But you pick up things, especially when you're short handed and need a warm body to fill a position, and then you desire to do more. I can't tell you the number of times I was schedule for dish washing, but I'd come in and I'd be put on break down.

    I learned how to dress whole animals, how to chop vegetables, how to start broths, all before I ever was serious about cooking.

    With those things, it's all about technique, and rote memorization. You break a chicken down a certain way, you break a cow carcass down in a certain way. You dress wild game, and other birds a certain way.

    You start a beef, chicken, or fish broth with the leavings of your break down, and then you build flavor from there. It's the base of any meal. And one of the easiest things to get wrong. Thats where the memorization comes in. Its not all memorization of course, you also must taste everything, always.

    You cut vegetables a certain way, depending on what dishes are being cooked that evening. How to chiffonade, how to paysanne cut, a large dice, the brunoise, or a julienne. And you learn how to do it fast, so fast that you don't have to look at your fingers while your knife is centimeters away.

    A good example of what culinary school doesn't teach you is adding salt to your garlic when crushing it to make it much finer, or dipping a lime in a bowl of water before squeezing, which makes tons of juice come out of it.

    I'm assuming, based on your post, that you're seeking to become a Chef. Good luck, I hope things work out for you. I'm here to answer any other questions you may have.

    --

    I'm hoping for this thread to become more than just me answering questions. If you didn't read it, @T3t post was a great addition of information that I just skipped over because I assumed working in the food scene you would know it. I'm not infalliable, nor do I speak for food, or Chef's everywhere.

    Most of this is just my opinion based on my experiences.

    Anyone else have anymore questions?
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2017
  15. VereorNox

    VereorNox Bomb Turban

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    Oi Zombie, what's a good low carb breakfast that doesn't involve me chugging down eggs every single morning? I'm getting kind of tired of it. The only variance I got is when I make Shakshuka.
     
  16. Paladin

    Paladin Second Year

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    As a cook for a 'fast casual' sit down restaurant local to Oklahoma and that's been expanding in the Midwest and Texas, what're ways I can help keep the mashed potatoes and mac'n'cheese alive in the steam table longer?
     
  17. Zombie

    Zombie John Waynes Teeth Prestige DLP Supporter

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    @VereorNox haven't forgotten you. Been under the weather.
    Add in as much real product as possible. Heavy cream, sour cream, mayonnaise for the mash. Keep them stirred up. Change them every three and a half to four hours. There isn't much you can do with out of the bag product. Especially if it's preseasoned with the companies blend of spices. Mac and cheese you can keep mixed up. Try keeping them on the cooler end of the hot table, keep a lid on them, etc so that the moisture doesn't evaporate from within. The steam table is still cooking them so you have to keep them at service temperature for safe consumption.

    I'd double check your SOP for hot and cold chain to make sure what kind of hold times your steam table is rated for.
     
  18. Oz

    Oz Heir to Hogwarts Moderator DLP Supporter

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    What to look for when buying scallops (or fresh seafood in general I guess)?
     
  19. Story Content: Breakfast
    Zombie

    Zombie John Waynes Teeth Prestige DLP Supporter

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    My wife is always showing me these types of videos because she likes them. While there is a lot of weird prep in them, some of them are pretty smart. Watch with your sound off because the music is fucking terrible.

    That's 30 meals that you can try for breakfast that are sorta egg lite. I looked into trying to find you something that didn't require eggs, or a lot of eggs and kept running into Ketogenic shit, which the hosts for those videos are fucking annoying.

    So, here are some chef's making breakfast foods:



    This dude looks like he has a cocaine mustache because of how blonde his facial hair is. Its funny to watch him from the side of your eye sometime. Epazote might be hard for you to get, you can use a mixture of mint and tarragon, or cilantro and dill to get an approximation of the flavor. If you can get epazote, then use it. Great stuff.

    Alternatively, these aren't videos, but you can try these. I don't each much fruit, but I have enjoyed them.

    Serves: 2
    Ingredients
    1 big banana
    2 TBSP almond butter
    1 TBSP raw honey/agave/maple syrup (you can used shelf stable or store bought honey for this, whatever is cheaper)
    1 TBSP tahini
    Toppings of choice: walnuts, raisins, almond flakes, sesame, chia seeds
    Instructions
    Slice your banana lengthwise.
    Mix almond butter with tahini and sweetener of choice
    Then layer it.

    This site does a decent interpretation of this recipe, plus it has pictures.

    1 lemon
    1 Tablespoon butter, room temperature
    2 Tablespoons brown sugar
    1/4 teaspoon salt
    1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
    1 vanilla bean
    Zest of one orange
    Juice of one orange
    1 Tablespoon Grand Marnier (optional)
    4 sprigs of fresh thyme
    4 firm pears

    1 cup whole milk ricotta
    2 Tablespoons pure maple syrup
    1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
    toasted almond

    My kids love this one. I like it a lot too, but then again I like to find things that I can include ricotta into, its fucking great.

    One 17 1/2-ounce container plain Greek yogurt
    1/2 cup heavy cream
    1 teaspoon vanilla extract
    1/2 cup brown sugar
    Assorted berries (or other fruit of your choice)

    A parfait is a great breakfast imo. I like this more than anything I've probably listed here, and it's carb light, but high in protein and dietary fiber. I usually layer pears, candied hazelnuts and a bit of ricotta to go with the yoghurt. :3

    Hope that helps.

    Going to have to break this up into multiple parts. I'll have the other videos and stuff included here shortly.
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2017
  20. Paladin

    Paladin Second Year

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    So this is purely for my personal interest:

    What kind of rub do you like to put together for when you smoke ribs or pork? Is it different from what you might prefer to use on beef? As for steak, I generally just like to let it sit out at room temperature for about twenty to thirty minutes with some salt and pepper on it before I slap those babies on the grill. Is that too pleb-tier in your opinion? (I like it, and I feel like it lets the meat do most of the work, taste-wise, without being over powering.)
     
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