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Culinary Ask a Chef: Or Zombie explains Cooking

Discussion in 'The Burrow' started by Zombie, Aug 25, 2017.

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  1. Story Content: Breakfast Cont./Pork Rubs/Seafood Best Practice
    Zombie

    Zombie John Waynes Teeth Prestige DLP Supporter

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    Had to make multiple post, sorry, to be able to include all the media.
    Continuing @VereorNox here: Have one more part after this probably.


    The way this guy says Sauce makes me laugh non-stop. But he's also a great Chef. I don't do a lot of "Breakfast." So, I usually do a brunch type deal. Lots of savory. Not much sweet. The one repcipe he does with "brown stock" is beef stock. You can buy that in a can or box, go with low sodium, if you do it, otherwise your food will be super salty ontop of what you've already added. And this episode is all eggs. Give it a chance though. :)

    Note: You whip eggs heavily like he does in the episode to introduce air into the egg, it makes the eggs fluffier when in omlette form. When you're doing a scramble? Don't whip them as much because it makes the eggs grainy and tough. Also note, homie cooks an omelette with a fork. Thats fucking skill.


    Not really low carb, but I like a nice french toast every once in awhile.
    Substitute liqueur with cinnamon should you not have the ability to get it.

    Not really carb friendly either, but everyone needs a cheat day :)


    A frittata can be made 1000 different ways. take your pick. This one is pretty good, and its something I've cooked with regularity.

    I got more, but there is a limit to how many videos that can be posted.


    Your way of cooking steak is one of the better ways. Room temperature is key. It just makes the meat better, as compared to taking it from the fridge and slapping it right on the grill.

    I mean if you want to spice it up a bit, you could try this as a rub, or even a marinade.

    Add your favorite beer (or whatever cheap domestic you have on hand), plus
    • 1 tablespoon dry mustard
    • 2 teaspoons granulated garlic
    • 2 teaspoons coarsely ground black pepper
    • 1 teaspoon sweet smoked Spanish paprika
    • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
    • 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
    • 1/2 salt
    • 1/2 pepper,
    Let it soak for 30 minutes minimum, or up to four hours. Steak is pretty forgiving as long as you don't mistreat it. Resting is key, before and after cooking, if I'm being factual here.

    Salt and Pepper are great for basic rubs, salt in particular because it helps pull out some of the beef flavor, which the steak then soaks back in, so that's why salt is the base of any rub. It helps get the rub into the meat.
    That marinade if you put it in a pot and cook it down, turns into a great dipping sauce. Try it, believe me, you'll like it.

    Smoked BBQ wise, there's your traditional NC BBQ rub,
    • 1 tablespoon mild paprika
    • 2 teaspoons light brown sugar
    • 1 1/2 teaspoons hot paprika
    • 1/2 teaspoon celery salt
    • 1/2 teaspoon garlic salt
    • 1/2 teaspoon dry mustard
    • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
    • 1/2 teaspoon onion powder
    • 1/4 teaspoon salt
    Works great for smoking.

    This is called Alabama White Sauce, but I use it for a lot of pork dishes.
    • 1/2 cup mayonnaise
    • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice (1/2 a large lemon)
    • 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
    • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
    • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
    It's got mayo in it, but it's definitely not the taste of the finished product. This is more of an after the fact kind of dressing. You can make a rub, or baste out of this that you use while smoking, which causes the meat to have a crusty outer shell. Its good with pulled pork, and as a baste on Pork ribs.

    Everyone's particular on their BBQ sauce. This is a super regional thing. I like all of them. Those two just happen to be my favorite.

    Poytin's Rub

    1 T Salt
    1 T Black Pepper
    1 T Cumin
    1 T Ground Coriander
    1 T Chili Powder
    1 T Granulated Onion
    1 T Granulated Garlic
    2 t Cayenne
    1 t Dried Oregano

    Typically used for a pork loin. But I've also used it on tri-tip to good effect.
    Credit to @Poytin

    General prep and storing information first: shrimp( or other seafood) or scallops can be bought frozen. Defrost slowly in the body of your fridge the day before you want to eat them. If you live in a coastal area, cook the day of purchase, they will keep if you don't eat them immediately, but you're working on a time frame here where it will only get worse with age.

    Always eat supermarket bought seafood the day you buy it. The seafood on display at your supermarket most likely thawed from frozen, considerably shortening its shelf life.


    Scallops, in particular are bi-valves. The part we most commonly eat is the muscle that opens and shuts the shell. When sold on the shell, this muscle is surrounded by orange roe, or coral, which is also good to eat, though you don’t see it much in the US. When caught fresh that roe is the best fucking thing ever.

    Sea scallops are large and chunky and bay scallops are smaller, about as big as the tip of your index finger. So, usually what you're eating whether it be frozen or fresh, is sea scallops. Bay scallops are using in pastas, while the sea scallops are sold as the main course. There are some farm raised scallop varieties. They usually have a weird coloration to the due to the food they're fed. This isn't natural, but its not harmful.

    When scallops are fresh, they are a pearly white with an almost opalescent pinkish tinge. If they are a creamy yellowish color, they are either not so fresh or have been thawed from frozen, and I tend to avoid buying them.

    A briney or sea water smell is the only thing you should notice. Any strong odor should raise an alarm.

    Buying seafood in general, keep an eye out for the COOL signage. Its those neat little origin stickers you see on the description plates of whatever you're buying. Its required by US law, and I'm sure in most countries it s a major selling point. COOL stands for Country of Origin Labeling.

    Buying whole fish, it should not look dry or have scales coming away, everything should look wet. The eyes should be clear and the gills super red. The flesh should have some bounce to it when you touch it. Filets should have an even tone with no dark spots.

    This is one super mega post, sorry guys got a bit behind.
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2017
  2. Xiph0

    Xiph0 Administrator Admin

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    I always make mustard BBQ sauce when I make brisket or pulled pork. You can make it in a jar or whatever, I usually let the bottle of mustard get about half-empty and then refill it with:

    - Cracked black pepper (make a little paper funnel or use your hand)
    - Hot sauce (whatever works, I usually use Tapatio or Sriracha). Couple squeezes/shakes.
    - A bit of molasses or brown sugar. Not very much, just enough to take the harshest edge off the mustard/vinegar.
    - Whatever else I'm feeling. Sometimes garlic, but not often. Sometimes smoked paprika, also not often.

    Then I top it off with white vinegar and shake it. It drizzles onto stuff well, and you can easily cook meat in it if you like it. I've brought it with me for lunches at work and shared and people seem to really go for it.
     
  3. Zombie

    Zombie John Waynes Teeth Prestige DLP Supporter

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    Mustard sauce is another great one. I like adding more vinegar to make it more wet.

    Some people don't like wet BBQ sauces, they like something that actually coats things instead. Which to each their own.

    One variation of mustard sauce that I really like, is adding Jalapeno. I'm not a fan of Sriracha at all. I just don't like the flavor.

    Tapatio is after my own heart though. Love me some tapatio. Texas Pete will do in a pinch.

    Smoked Paprika is an acquired taste, but I really like how it adds to certain flavors.
     
  4. Moukaboy

    Moukaboy Third Year

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    Just a reminder since you mentioned it that a well done Shakshuka is food of the gods
     
  5. Poytin

    Poytin The Arby's Hipster DLP Supporter

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    Thank you, finally someone else that thinks this.

    As for the BBQ discussion I'm a big fan of dry rubs. One I use frequently:

    1 T Salt
    1 T Black Pepper
    1 T Cumin
    1 T Ground Coriander
    1 T Chili Powder
    1 T Granulated Onion
    1 T Granulated Garlic
    2 t Cayenne
    1 t Dried Oregano

    Typically used for a pork loin. But I've also used it on tri-tip to good effect.
     
  6. Mage

    Mage Chief Warlock DLP Supporter

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    What's a meal that you can cook on Sunday and have 3 or 4 lunches out of for the following week and they still taste good (obviously they won't be great, but I'm mostly looking for palatable). Due to the nature of my work I'm usually not home until 8 or later and can't find the energy to cook that night for my lunch the following day, however I've fallen into the trap of eating out way too much. I really do enjoy cooking, however with time constraints find myself needing to do large quantities. Interestingly, what I've found actually lasts the best is crock pot Indian food and then I can just steam some rice the night before and have (relatively) fresh rice with it. Grilling some meat and then buying fresh lettuce for a salad also works, though is pretty boring.

    Thanks for doing this thread Zombie, really enjoying it!
     
  7. Story Content: Meals that last all week.
    Zombie

    Zombie John Waynes Teeth Prestige DLP Supporter

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    Do you have a preference? Or just something that you can bulk easily?

    Ingredients
    • 6 fresh lasagne sheets
    • 100g buffalo mozzarella, chopped
    • 100g grated parmesan, extra
    • basil leaves, to garnish
    Sauce
    1 tbs olive oil
    • 1 large brown onion, finely chopped
    • 3 cloves garlic, crushed
    • 2 bay leaves
    • 400 g can crushed tomatoes
    • 750 ml passata
    • 1 bunch fresh basil, chopped
    Filling
    • 200 g bunch spinach
    • 500g ricotta
    • 1 egg, lightly beaten
    • 50g butter, melted
    • 100 grated parm
    • 200g piece smoked ham
    • ¼ tsp ground nutmeg

    You can buy the already made lasagna noodles and just let them rest in some hot water to soften. Like, boil a bit of water, put it in a flat dish, and then after they're soft, take them from the water and let them rest on a drying sheet. Don't let them sit in their own water, the starch of the pasta makes the noodles super sticky and messy if they sit for too long.

    To make the sauce, heat oil in heavy saucepan over medium heat. Cook onions and garlic until soft. Onions until they're translucent, you're not looking to brown them, but as close to brown as they can be. So just past translucent. Add the garlic towards the end of the browning, let that cook until you smell the garlic strongly. Stir in remaining ingredients. Season. Simmer, partially covered, stirring frequently, for about 45 minutes or until the sauce is thick. Remove bay leaves. Those you put in whole for easy removal.

    To make the filling you're going to cook down the spinach until it's wilted, remove from pan until it cools, then chop finely. In a mixing bowl add ricotta, butter and egg, stir in the spinach and any remaining ingredients. Add pepper.

    You're going to preheat your oven to 180C or 355F.

    Divide the filling into six portions to be spread over six sheets of the lasagna, you're going to roll from the short end. Cut them in half, or thirds, depending on how big you like your bites. Spread half the sauce over a baking dish, and place the halves cut side up evenly through the sauce. The pan shouldn't be huge because that will fuck with your cook time, so something that will fit the portions and size of the rollups you just made.

    Pour the remaining sauce over the top of the pasta coating evenly. I find using a serving spoon to dole it out that way works best, stops shit from dripping over the side of your pan and creating a huge mess on your counter tops. Or you can just dump it over top. Depends on your confidence honestly. You can't pour slow or it goes down the side of the pan, too fast and it splashes everywhere.

    Top with shredded mozzarella and parmesan, bake in your hot oven until the cheese is melted and starting to brown, or until hot. So maybe 30 minutes at most.

    Serving for this is six people, so you could eat two a day for three days, or longer depending on how much lunch you want to take. You can serve a salad on the side if that's your thing. Can honestly go with steamed rice as well. The sauce makes the rice taste good, or be eaten by itself.

    If you want to make enough for the entire week, then I'd suggest upping the recipe amounts by a third for the filling, maybe a quarter. Extra sauce (which I'll throw in here, you can just use something from a jar. Do not use Marinara - Marinara has the wrong consistency.)

    • 1/4 cup olive oil
    • 2 lemons--1 zested and juiced (about 1 1/2 tsp. zest, 4 tbsp. juice) and 1 thinly sliced
    • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
    • 2 cloves garlic, minced
    • 1 1/2 pounds red potatoes, cut into 1-inch cubes
    • 1 1/2 pounds bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs, or whole chicken
    • 4 sprigs fresh rosemary

    Preheat the oven to 425F or 218C degrees.

    In a bowl, whisk the oil, lemon zest and juice (dip the lemon in a bowl of water before squeezing and you get the max amount of juice from each half), mustard and garlic. Season the dressing with salt and pepper.

    On a baking sheet, not flat - something with a rim, toss the potatoes, chicken, rosemary and sliced lemon with the dressing, salt and pepper to taste. Arrange the potato mixture and chicken, skin side up, in a single layer. (This is using a broke down chicken, a whole chicken you would coat the whole chicken in the dressing separately, tie the legs together, make sure the innards are taken out, unless you like that kind of flavor), and then place it in the oven.

    You'll turn the potatoes once, until all sides are browned and can easily be stabbed with a fork. If you're doing a whole chicken I'd suggest starting the chicken cooking first, and then after about 30 minutes add the potatoes and cook for another 15 minutes, be sure to flip the potatoes.


    This recipe can be made into several different quick meals. Chicken salad for sandwiches. Here's a recipe.

    • 1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
    • 2 tablespoons mayonnaise
    • 1 teaspoon parsley flake.
    • 1/2 teaspoon seasoned salt
    • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper.
    • 1/2 rotisserie chicken (your whole chicken, or remain chicken segments, cut into bite-size chunks until you have about two cups worth.
    • 1/2 cup thinly sliced celery
    • 1/4 cup chopped red onion

    You can cube the chicken, or shred, with shredding you'll need a lot more chicken, so I'd keep that in mind. Put the chicken into a bowl, add your flavoring and spices, mix until coated. Put on a kaiser roll, or whatever bread you like your sandwiches on. I am partial to either ciabatta, a kaiser roll (the cornmeal on the outside goes great with the flavor of the chicken), or an onion roll.

    I can give you more suggestions if you want. Just let me know.
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2017
  8. Mage

    Mage Chief Warlock DLP Supporter

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    These are awesome, no real preference since there's pretty much no food I don't like. These recipes look great, I'd love to get some more but will go ahead and try these first.

    Thanks a bunch!
     
  9. Darth_Revan

    Darth_Revan Secret Squirrel Prestige DLP Supporter

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    Alright, @Zombie: Garlic. Should it be crushed, minced, or pressed?
     
  10. Koalas

    Koalas Dark Lord DLP Supporter

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    Eaten whole?
     
  11. Story Content: Garlic
    Zombie

    Zombie John Waynes Teeth Prestige DLP Supporter

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    I do a mixture of mince and crushed.

    You crush first, smack with the flat of your blade, mince, run your knife back and forth flat side down, and then mince agian. Makes for a much better texture imo, especially if you're looking to active the flavor of the garlic, but not have bits of it stuck in your teeth.

    If you want a finer mince, do the above actions, but with a bit of salt. This turns the garlic into a fine paste, which you would never get just from mincing.

    Some meals call for sliced, stews and long cook sauces work better with sliced garlic simply because like THC, they need to get hot enough to activate the essential oils.

    For example, a big pot of bolognese sauce, before you add the meat, cook that down with either a couple whole cloves of garlic, or sliced, use an emulsion blender to make the sauce a nice smooth consistency, then add your meat.

    Another garlic trick is to nuke it in the microwave before crushing, which activates the flavor. Do it with the skins on and it makes for easy peeling.

    Garlic presses are for pussies that don't know how to use garlic properly. You can chop a whole head of garlic faster than you can press it.
    I believe in one of the videos I linked earlier in the thread, Mario Batali talks about using garlic in cooking. Something along the lines of, "Use the amount of garlic that the person you're going to be making out with later likes."
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2017
  12. Eilyfe

    Eilyfe Death Eater

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    Not so much a cooking question as a clean-up question.

    Any advice on making cleaning cheese crust from a casserole dish easier? I do it in cold water, but it's still a bitch.
     
  13. Zombie

    Zombie John Waynes Teeth Prestige DLP Supporter

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    Not necessarily an after the fact method, but, use a light weight cooking spray, line the dish with parchment paper/wax paper, forming a cross, using the spray to allow the parchment to stick to the dish, crimp it around the edges and use bulldog clips to hold it in place over the edges if it is rimmed, or along the edge if it is not. Then put in your crust.
     
  14. Moukaboy

    Moukaboy Third Year

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    [/SPOILER]What do you think of Binging with Babish ? have you tried any of his recipes ?

    related :
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2017
  15. Zombie

    Zombie John Waynes Teeth Prestige DLP Supporter

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    Yeah, I follow him.
    Has his own cookbook, it's mostly recipes that he's reconstructed from TV shows and movies. Which some of them are interesting. Its a mixture of the obscene pushing towards Epic Meal Time levels with some of the recipes he does (Utltimeatum, MoistMaker, that Pie from GOT) But its a great look at experimental break down of how to approximate ingredients to get something that taste good.

    You'll notice some of the ones he does, based on the movies, don't actually taste that good, so then he reconstructs them to taste better. That takes a decent amount of skill.

    @Moukaboy Throw your video in a spoiler tag please, I'm trying to not stretch the page out too much with large media elements.
     
  16. Moukaboy

    Moukaboy Third Year

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    Interesting , maybe i'll give some of the recipes a go then
    My real question is how do you develop that sort of skill set , is it through trial and error or do you think some people are just more cut out for it ?
    It'd be kinda fun to try and i'll probably go through it regardless of the answer but i still like to know what you think about it

    sure thing !
     
  17. Zombie

    Zombie John Waynes Teeth Prestige DLP Supporter

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    Its all trial and error, failing, and then improving. If you fuck something up food wise, its easy to tell because it will taste bad, or not what you expected it to taste like.

    Cooking is about accentuating flavors that you want to come through, combining others to make a more robust profile, and not overpowering other ingredients.

    I imagine Babbish does as well as he does because he has to do multiple takes, and puts a lot of thought and research into the ingredients he uses.

    Cooking is more than adding shit to a pot/pan and expecting it to happen. Any competent persons most valuable skill is taste, and sight.

    Taste to see if it taste good, sight if it looks appealing to you, it will taste good. If it looks like a pile of shit on the plate, then it will most likely taste like a pile of shit. It means your flavors are muddied, and you blended when you should have stirred, or you fried when you should have sauted.
     
  18. Marsupial

    Marsupial Death Eater DLP Supporter

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    I've enjoyed baking for years, but it's only the last 6 months or so I've started really, actively trying to make shit look fancy. Parchment paper is goddamn life-changing if you want decent looking edges on pies/cakes/cheesecakes; I use that stuff on pretty much everything now. Finally bought a silicone baking sheet as well, which was a pretty solid investment for a similar reason.
     
  19. Zombie

    Zombie John Waynes Teeth Prestige DLP Supporter

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    Yeah silicone sheets are great for baking. Works well for things like melted sugar as well.
     
  20. Johnnyseattle

    Johnnyseattle Auror DLP Supporter

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    To me, the absolute best use for a silicone baking sheet is making parmesan crisps.
    --- Post automerged ---
    @Zombie, once I've opened a hunk of cheese, what's the best way to store it again so it'll keep more than a few days? I can get a bit of mileage out of stuff, but I wanted to know what you'd do.
     
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