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Hey Guest! Are you any good at cooking? Got a favourite recipe that you love to cook or bring out to impress that special someone? Why not share it! A new forum called The Burrow has opened and it's all about homemaking!

Salmon: Pink, it's what's for dinner.

Discussion in 'The Burrow' started by pbluekan, Sep 12, 2017.

  1. pbluekan

    pbluekan Seventh Year DLP Supporter

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    Salmon is the best fish. It's good when prepared properly, and spectacularly good for you. I like making it, and I like eating it. Let's get some recipes.

    The key to salmon is simplicity and quality. A lot of people try to cover the fishy taste of shitty filets with a lot of spice and overdone sauces. In reality all you need is a quality filet from your seafood guy at the supermarket and a light balance of flavors. Sweet, citrusy, and tangy flavors go best with salmon in my opinion, though I have had some wonderful blackened salmon in the past.
    --- Post automerged ---


    Edit: Fuck you automerge.

    So I've got a few good salmon recipes. I'm not going to include side dishes, but I'll make some recommendations. Fair warning, most of my recipes don't include exact measurements, but I just generally make "to taste".

    Cedar plank salmon filet marinated in a citrus honey mustard sauce.

    Materials:

    Salmon:
    • Sockeye salmon filet. (Sockeye is best IMO, but farm raised will do. Sockeye has a richer flavor and color and tends to not have the overly fishy taste present in shittier quality farm raised. Some farm raised is amazing however.)
    • For a quality farm raised salmon filet, look for thick bands of white in the flesh. This is fatty tissue and will give the fish a rich flavor that is not overly fishy. These bands are hard to see in sockeye, but sockeye generally doesn't have as fishy a taste.
    Cedar Planks:
    • These can be bought at the supermarket. Get either one that will fit your entire filet, or multiple smaller pices to fit individual portions.
    • Soak the plank(s) for a minimum of two hours and a maximum of twelve hours in water prior to baking.
    • A cedar plank is NOT NECESSARY FOR THIS RECIPE if you choose not to use it, simply place the salmon on a baking sheet and decrease the cooking time by about 10-15 minutes.
    Sauce:
    • ~1/4 cup honey. (Clover is best)
    • ~1.5 cups orange juice.
    • ~1 tsp Chardonnay mustard
    • ~1 tsp Dijon mustard
    • 1/2 tsp Thyme
    (For large filets you will likely need more of this sauce.)

    Miscellaneous:
    • 1 orange, thinly sliced rounds.

    Process:
    1. Dissolve the honey in the orange juice (you can heat the orange juice in the microwave, but gently and not to a boil).
    2. Add the Chardonnay mustard. It's sweet, the Dijon is what you need to be careful with.
    3. Add Dijon mustard a little bit at a time and mix thoroughly. It is ready when you can taste the spice and mustard, but it is just an afterthought to the citrus and honey. You may add more to taste and if you like a bit of spice.
    4. Add the thyme.
    5. If you need to portion out your salmon filet, do so now by cutting across the filet in portions starting at 2 inches wide and increasing as you go down the filet. (The filet narrows and thins, this keeps portions equal). Leave the skin on, that shit is healthy.
    6. Place your filets in a ziploc bag.
    7. Set aside a quarter cup of the sauce and add the rest to a bag along with your salmon.
    8. Marinate salmon for ~2 hours in the fridge.
    9. Preheat oven to 325 and ensure there is a middle rack for the salmon and a lower for the drip tray. Making messes is bad.
    10. After marinating, place the salmon skin side down on the cedar planks and place on the middle rack over the drip tray.
    11. Bake for a minimum of 30 minutes and up to 45. This depends on the thickness of the individual portions of the filet. If baking a whole filet, the thinner portions will overcook slightly. Trim them and add to a sandwich or something you lazy fuck.
    12. Every fifteen to twenty minutes or so, brush the top of the filet with the sauce that was set aside. Be quick, don't let the oven lose too much heat.
    13. After about 20 minutes in the oven, lay an orange slice on top of the filet. Keep brushing that shit with the secret sauce.
    14. The salmon is finished when it can be flaked with a fork. If you see a white effluent oozing from the filet it is not done yet, but it's almost there. That's just some of the fats rendering down. If your salmon is still clear or raw on the inside it is not done.
    15. Take that shit out and eat. If you made it spicier, serve it with a sweet corn succotash and sautéed vegetables. If you made it sweeter, serve it with some peppery mashed potatoes and asparagus.
    This can be done on a grill as well. I don't know the time or temp requirements. Use google.
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2017
  2. KHAAAAAAAN!!

    KHAAAAAAAN!! Troll in the Dungeon Prestige DLP Supporter

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    Wasabi Oil and a little soy sauce is my go-to baked salmon topper. Or just a fuckload of lemon juice and dill. I don't bother with wood planks because I'm lazy and the taste difference is marginal.
     
  3. Zombie

    Zombie John Waynes Teeth Prestige DLP Supporter

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    I don't really like my fish cooked too much.

    But,
    • 1 pound salmon cut into ¾ inch cubes
    • 1/4 cup soy sauce low sodium, or tamari
    • 1 teaspoon rice wine vinegar or apple cider vinegar
    • 1 teaspoon chili paste
    • 1 teaspoon Sesame oil
    Pickled Cucumbers
    • 2 6-inch cucumbers thinly sliced
    • 1/2 cup rice wine vinegar
    • 1/2 cup water
    • 1/3 cup honey
    • 1 teaspoon salt
    • 1/2 teaspoon red chili flakes dried
    chili sauce
    • 2 tablespoons chilipaste
    • 2 tablespoons plain greek yogurt or lmayonnaise

    In a bowl combine salmon, soy sauce, vinegar, chili paste and sesame oil(this shits strong so go easy on it). Cover and chill.

    In a pan combine vinegar, water, honey, salt and chili flake. Bring to a boil over high heat, once its boiling turn off the heat add your cucumber slices (I do a julienne), let it rest for about 10 minutes and you have quick homemade pickles. Cover and chill until ready to use.

    In a small bowl, whisk two tablespoons of chili paste, and 2 tablespoons yogurt (or mayo if you prefer)

    ???

    Build an awesome Poke bowl. I'd suggest going with some brown rice, or some salad greens of some sort, top with 1/2 cup of the poke, the cucumber and sesame seed. Drizzle on the sauce.

    Enjoy.
     
  4. Johnnyseattle

    Johnnyseattle Auror DLP Supporter

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    I'm a bit more of the Ron Swanson type when it comes to salmon; my ingredient list is generally salmon, salt, and fire.

    It's too good to cover up with all that other nonsense. :colbert:
     
  5. Zombie

    Zombie John Waynes Teeth Prestige DLP Supporter

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    Eh, Ron Swanson is right with most bits of meat, but if you got a nice piece of fish, the best way is raw, imo.

    Or alternatively, if you want to cook it, instead of heat, use an acid like lemon or lime juice.
     
  6. Johnnyseattle

    Johnnyseattle Auror DLP Supporter

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    I didn't see your post until after I made mine, but I'm with you on the poke. Uwajimaya (an Asian grocery chain in the PNW) has the best salmon poke bowls I've ever experienced, so I guess I'm not 100% Swanson. I never thought I'd have anything better than I got while living in Hawaii, but it's on my "last meal" candidate list.
     
  7. Marsupial

    Marsupial Death Eater DLP Supporter

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    Cold-smoked salmon wrapped around a thin sliver of de-seeded habanero is divine. That and hot-smoked salmon with a maple syrup and black pepper glaze are probably my favourites in terms of salmon preparations.

    Salmon + smoke is a magical combination.
     
  8. pbluekan

    pbluekan Seventh Year DLP Supporter

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    Truth.

    Salmon is also the best sashimi, and as ever, thicker the bands of white, the better. I'm reasonably sure you have to go specifically to the Asian markets to find sushi grade though. Otherwise you're risking parasites.
     
  9. Zombie

    Zombie John Waynes Teeth Prestige DLP Supporter

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    You can find some in the non-asian markets, but sashimi grade fish is fatty, you want that fat as a counterpoint to the meat, which you're right if it's not stored right you can get parasites. I think there is a market towards the coast I frequent. Anything too far inland, you're not going to find good sushi grade fish.

    Asian markets are good for any kind of fish, are equipped to handle fish correctly, and I usually buy from one as compared to some wholesaler fishmonger. Most fish in your markets is going to be lean because it's bred in captivity.

    You will pay a premium, however.

    I have a guy that can get me any type of fish I want pretty much, same day, and fresh. Just need to give him a couple days warning.
     
  10. pbluekan

    pbluekan Seventh Year DLP Supporter

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    There's a decent Asian market here in Denver that carries a decent selection of sushi grade, oddly enough. They get their fish from Seattle Fish Co. as I recall, which is the same distributor that covers most of the sushi places in the state. Quality is degraded some from however they keep it fresh, but it isn't bad by any means.