1. Hey Guest, welcome back to DLP

    As you can see, we've changed our look. We've migrated from vBulletin to the Xenforo forum system. There may be issues or missing functionality, if you find anything or have feedback, please check out the new Xenforo Migration Feedback forum.

    Our dark ("Dark Lord Potter") theme is under heavy development. We also have a light ("Light Lord Potter") theme for those happier with a light background and darker text.

    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Hey Guest! Are you any good at cooking? Got a favourite recipe that you love to cook or bring out to impress that special someone? Why not share it! A new forum called The Burrow has opened and it's all about homemaking!

Skylines, cities and architecture thread

Discussion in 'Graphics Discussion' started by Taure, Apr 9, 2016.

  1. Taure

    Taure Magical Core Enthusiast Prestige DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2006
    Messages:
    948
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    High Score:
    13,152
    I can't be the only one here who appreciates urban architecture and a good skyline. This is a thread for sharing pictures, videos and articles about cool urban design.

    Obligatory London pics, because I love the mix of old and new:

    The Shard and Tower Bridge

    [​IMG]

    Skyline

    [​IMG]

    Heading into the City

    [​IMG]

    The City and London Bridge area

    [​IMG]

    Here's a video visualising what London will look like in a few years, when all current construction work is completed: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uDnfZYwl2XM

    Ignore the boring commentary and just watch it for the visualisations in the first part.

    And here's an article on the City's newest proposed skyscraper, 1 Undershaft. Here's what that cluster will look like when complete:

    [​IMG]

    And also a couple of Santiago, Chile:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2016
  2. Joe

    Joe The Reminiscent Exile Prestige DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2008
    Messages:
    499
    Location:
    Perth, Western Australia
    High Score:
    1,800
    Great thread idea.

    My favourites.

    Banff, Alberta - the bridge looking toward the immensity of Cascade Mountain:

    [​IMG]

    And Bath, England:

    [​IMG]

    Funnily enough, two places I've shot the shit with LittleChicago.
     
  3. Palindrome

    Palindrome Magma Moderator Moderator DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2009
    Messages:
    2,377
    Location:
    England
    Oh, I thought this thread would be in reference to cities skyline due to its title for some reason - showing off architectural things you've built in various games. Hmm.

    Uhh. Would... anyone be interested in that sort of thing? I might make a thread.
     
  4. Hawkin

    Hawkin Minister of Magic

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2011
    Messages:
    1,227
    Location:
    QC, Canada
    I remember being awed by the Montreal Skyline as I came back from work last summer. It looked like this as I went on the bridge:

    [​IMG]
     
  5. MonkeyEpoxy

    MonkeyEpoxy Alchemist

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2011
    Messages:
    2,358
    Location:
    Texas
    The view from PNC Park in Pittsburgh. One of my favorite stadiums.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. Taure

    Taure Magical Core Enthusiast Prestige DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2006
    Messages:
    948
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    High Score:
    13,152
  7. silentclock

    silentclock Headmaster DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    May 13, 2010
    Messages:
    1,106
    Location:
    Kentucky
    Louisville's skyline--not as impressive as some others, but I like it.

    [​IMG]

    Then of course we have the Twin Spires at Churchill Downs.

    [​IMG]

    Incidentally, I'm loving this thread. That picture of Banff is breathtaking.
     
  8. Red Aviary

    Red Aviary Hogdorinclawpuff Prestige DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2008
    Messages:
    474
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    New York (State)
    High Score:
    2,757
    I've always liked the buildings in New York, even if I sometimes wish the city (and Long Island while we're at it) would break off and sink into the Atlantic. These are a couple wallpapers I have.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Oh good, London's ugly and getting uglier. GG Britain.
     
  9. redlibertyx

    redlibertyx Professor

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2011
    Messages:
    442
    There are two architectural styles I really dig: (a) brutalist and (b) asian architecture. Here's some examples I really like.

    Alexandra Road Estate:

    [​IMG]

    Barbican Estate:

    [​IMG]

    The Potala Palace in Tibet:

    [​IMG]

    Hongyadong Hotel (洪崖洞) in Chongqing:

    [​IMG]

    Taipei 101:

    [​IMG]

    An (illegally constructed) luxury villa on top of an apartment building in Beijing.

    [​IMG]

    I believe it has since been demolished, but I never really checked up on it. Reminds me a bit of that skyscraper with a castle on top from Gargoyles.

    Also: if we're going to post ballparks, why not the best ballpark in the world? AT&T Park, Home of the San Francisco Giants:

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2016
  10. Ash

    Ash Moves Like Jagger DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2010
    Messages:
    1,747
    Location:
    Atlanta
    Atlanta's is nothing too special, but I like it.

    [​IMG]
     
  11. DerHesse

    DerHesse High Inquisitor

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2010
    Messages:
    556
    Location:
    Frankfurt/Main
    Speicherstadt in Hamburg

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  12. Hawkin

    Hawkin Minister of Magic

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2011
    Messages:
    1,227
    Location:
    QC, Canada
  13. M.L.

    M.L. Seventh Year

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2014
    Messages:
    269
    Location:
    Beyond the Pale
    Come now heretic, its obvious that the best ballpark in the world is the great green jewel, America's most beloved ballpark, Fenway Park.
    [​IMG]

    I'm also a huge fan of Lubeck, brick gothic is just...
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2016
  14. Hawkin

    Hawkin Minister of Magic

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2011
    Messages:
    1,227
    Location:
    QC, Canada
    I love this picture of Central Park, and coincidentally Manhattan.

    [​IMG]
     
  15. Sesc

    Sesc Slytherin at Heart Moderator

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2007
    Messages:
    5,059
    Location:
    Hbg., Germany
    This thread definitely needs an update :3

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    This is what it looks like if you spent ~$1bn to build a concert hall. And here's a nice article.


    A new concert hall in Hamburg transforms the city
    By Philip Kennicott​

    The Elbphilharmonie, a concert hall in Hamburg encased in glass and set upon a giant brick warehouse, is surrounded on three sides by the waters of the city’s bustling harbor. Designed by the Swiss architecture firm Herzog and de Meuron, the building cost about $850 million, took more than a decade to design and build, and was for a long time cited as a joke — a dark joke — among Germans who fretted that the project had become an albatross: unbuildable, over budget, and wildly out of proportion to what the sensible people of this mercantile city wanted or needed.

    But the building, one of several projects around the world which aim self-consciously for “iconic” status and have price tags in the billion-dollar range, opened to international acclaim on Jan. 11. The acoustics, designed by the renowned Japanese acoustician Yasuhisa Toyota, are a marvel of clarity, precision and cool objectivity. Visitors enjoy stunning views of the industrial grit of Hamburg, renewing the city’s relation to the source of its wealth and its cultural window on the larger world. Tourists flock to ascend the Elphie’s long escalator, rising through the old warehouse in a tunnel of white glass and plaster to visit the rooftop terrace, which bustles with activity before and long after evening concerts. If you want to attend a concert, good luck, because almost everything is sold out.

    “Demand is overwhelming,” says Christoph Lieben-Seutter, general director of the Elbphilharmonie. Subscriptions for classical concerts have doubled since the hall opened, tour operators are pressuring the organization to make more tickets available, and more than 1.5 million people have visited the public plaza since it opened last November. The building has become a phenomenon throughout the country. “Music isn’t just the talk of the town, it is the talk of Germany,” Lieben-Seutter says.

    In March, the Caracas-based Simon Bolivar Symphony Orchestra played all nine Beethoven symphonies at the new hall. At the end of the third movement from Symphony No. 5, where the first violins seem to get stuck dithering a scattered reminiscence of the main theme, there is one of the most famous crescendos in the history of music, a swelling and triumphant transition from darkness to light. The sound in the hall was so accurate that if you closed your eyes, you could point to exactly the spot where the timpani player was gently thumping his drums, and as the winds joined the strings, each addition to the burgeoning chord was like another color being added to the spectrum, until the light was brilliant and white.

    Those eight bars could stand for the astonishing shift in public perceptions about the building, “from a scandal to a world wonder,” as Lieben-Seutter puts it. Two decades after a Frank Gehry-designed outpost of the Guggenheim Museum opened in Bilbao, Spain, the idea that a building can transform a city, or a cultural institution, isn’t held in high repute anymore. Debt and disillusion have made the “Bilbao effect” seem a hollow promise of a different age.

    Here it is, back again, and it’s imperative to know why it is working. Why this building? What about its design, its location and the implicit social messages embedded in its architecture have made it so successful? Carsten Brosda, a senator in Hamburg’s state government and head of its cultural authority, says location is a primary factor in its success. “I was never a fan of iconic buildings because so many of them are rather generic,” he says. But Elbphilharmonie is exceptional, located in the geographical heart of the city, on a site that demanded some exceptional public use. “There were architects saying this is on the verge of being unbuildable, but that is what makes it unique.”

    The care taken with the acoustics are another factor. Toyota doesn’t try to replicate the sumptuous warmth of 19th-century concert halls. Rather, he aims for a live-performance sound adapted to the digital age, which reinforces pleasures lost to an era of cheap headphones and limited-range MP3 files. There is no golden aura, but there is fantastic clarity and spatial presence. Part of that success, at the Elbphilharmonie, may be attributable to what people here call the “white skin,” an interior surface of 10,000 unique gypsum-fiber panels that help diffuse sound.

    But it is the architecture, the way it floats like a giant ship above the old brick factory, the drama of how one enters and moves through its spaces, and the way it situates people in relation to each other in the soaring auditorium, that makes this building truly extraordinary. The shape of the building was first adumbrated by Jacques Herzog, a principal of the firm that became world famous for the “Bird’s Nest” stadium at the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics. Herzog supposedly scribbled a wavy form on top of a picture of the old, 1960s-era Kaispeicher A warehouse, and the idea quickly became embedded in Hamburg’s civic consciousness.

    “Everybody was basically nuts about this,” Brosda says. The project is part of a major multibillion-dollar redevelopment of Hamburg’s harbor, converting 19th-century brick buildings and empty lots into residential, office and commercial space. But a concert hall atop an old factory was counterintuitive. The constrained and irregularly shaped floor plate of the warehouse meant that the auditorium, above, would be abnormally vertical in its layout. And placing it so high above the ground meant that street life, so important to most urban developments, would need to be sucked up into the sky and redistributed on the terrace some eight floors above.

    Entry to the concert spaces — which include the 2,100-seat main hall and a 572-seat recital hall — is accessed up a curving flight of wooden steps. When the building is open for performances, the visitor encounters no doors; the path up the steps leads directly into the lobby areas, which flow uninterrupted into the auditorium. The seating is in the round, or “vineyard” style, with the audience arrayed close to the stage in a set of shallow, interconnecting balconies.

    Often, architects and critics stress the “democratic” or egalitarian virtues of vineyard-style seating, though the peculiar height of the Elbphilharmonie makes the lower seats, closest to the orchestra, more equal than others, especially the highest ones, which can inspire vertigo. It’s not a democratic seating plan with all seats being equal, but it is one that fosters an exciting sense of community during performances, with the audience aware not just of the music, but of its own presence in the space.

    “This is a house for everybody,” says Ascan Mergenthaler, the senior partner at Herzog and de Meuron in charge of the project. But this was clearly a hall designed for, and intended to elevate (literally and symbolically), the experience of classical music. And that is remarkably refreshing. Brosda says one reason the building has been so quickly embraced despite the huge cost overruns is that it reaffirms values essential to Germany. “Questions of culture become more and more important today,” Brosda says. “It is a statement by a free and open society.”

    It is also a magical place to hear music. The ride up its 262-foot-long escalator creates a genuine sense of expectation and detaches one from the everyday world, mimicking the wide staircase and symbolic ascent of traditional concert hall architecture. During three concerts in March, the audience was scrupulously well behaved, attentive and enthusiastic. Even the signs marking the restrooms — which show a male figure in a tie and a female figure in a long, sleeveless evening gown — suggest how comfortable the Germans are with formality and elegance, which they don’t reflexively equate with hierarchy or privilege as we do in the United States.

    And that may be the last and most important reason that this hall could revive, at least once and perhaps only here, the “Bilbao effect,” transforming a place, or an art form, or cultural attitudes through architecture. The design of this building takes the idea of listening to serious music seriously, it posits the experience as an event to be relished, and it celebrates a species of aural attention that is in danger of extinction: collective, attentive, in communion with the musicians and the audience alike. This building, high above the city and its industrial waterfront, suggests that music can still stop time for a few hours and extinguish the triviality of the world, seen for a while only as a blur of lights, twinkling in the distance and reflected on the turbid water far below.​


    And it is all that. Whether it is romantic piano music (I enjoyed etudes by Skrjabin, Rachmaninov and Prokovyev and a fantastic pianist yesterday), or a full orchestra, like one of the mentioned Beethoven concertos back in March that I could attend, it's magical, and standing afterwards on the terrace on a warm summer night, talking, drinking, looking over the water and the harbour, is one of the things that have no price.

    No, you really do not need this. But by god, am I happy that we have it.
     
  16. Xiph0

    Xiph0 Administrator Admin

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2005
    Messages:
    8,821
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    People's Republic of California
    Skyline of Sacramento, CA looking down the river. You can really see how they built the city over the river:

    [​IMG]

    The pictures are usually cropped to highlight the 'skyscrapers' on the right, which I always found silly. They're not that tall of buildings and most of the city is pretty flat, so it's misleading. That said, it's a beautiful city and one of my favorite places in general.

    You've got cool (and afforable to rent) Victorian houses in the city center:

    [​IMG]

    (Disclaimer: I dunno if this one is downtown, but there's a lot downtown just like this right by the capitol building that definitely get rented for reasonable rates)

    Cool ass gothic cathedrals right in the middle of Downtown? Check:

    [​IMG]

    How about a giant glass building on the river that handles... retirement for public employees - and a pyramid-type thing that I never really figured out what the fuck it was for?

    [​IMG]

    I dunno. I just dig that place. It has an old city vibe but everyone is chill and there's no anxiety about preserving it.
     
  17. The-Hyphenated-One

    The-Hyphenated-One Chief Warlock DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2006
    Messages:
    1,407
    Location:
    Seattle
    St. Paul's Cathedral

    [​IMG]

    Riverside Museum

    [​IMG]

    Glenfinnan Viaduct

    [​IMG]
     
  18. Xiph0

    Xiph0 Administrator Admin

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2005
    Messages:
    8,821
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    People's Republic of California
    Viaduct and Hamburg are super cool. Impractical and a bad idea to build buildings right on the river like that, but I really like the aesthetic.
     
  19. Darth_Revan

    Darth_Revan Secret Squirrel Prestige DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2006
    Messages:
    86
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    The Empire City
    High Score:
    2810
    Well, first things first, a little pride for the greatest city on the face of the earth.

    Midtown.
    [​IMG]

    And Lower Manhattan.
    [​IMG]

    I actually really love how the Freedom Tower aka 1WTC turned out.

    Finally, my two favorite public space pieces of architecture:

    The Great Entrance Hall in the Metropolitan Museum of Art.
    [​IMG]

    And the Grand Hall in Grand Central Terminal.
    [​IMG]


    But on the subject of really impressive things from other places:

    I've always found aqueducts to be among the most impressive constructions, given their size, engineering, and antiquity. This one is in Segovia, Spain.
    [​IMG]

    Speaking of antiquity and marvels of engineering, you can't forget the breathtaking wonder of the dome at the Pantheon.
    [​IMG]

    Tall things are awesome. So, Burj Khalifa.
    [​IMG]

    Also, bridges over terrifying drops. Beipanjiang Bridge in Guizhou province, China.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2017
  20. methor

    methor Fourth Year

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2011
    Messages:
    126
    Are they really growing rice on that sheer cliff face?