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Culinary Ask a Chef: Or Zombie explains Cooking

Discussion in 'The Burrow' started by Zombie, Aug 25, 2017.

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  1. Darth_Revan

    Darth_Revan Secret Squirrel Prestige DLP Supporter

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    I'd like to go back to basics. Thanksgiving is coming up, so I'd like to know the best method for roasting a Turkey.
     
  2. Joe

    Joe The Reminiscent Exile Prestige DLP Supporter

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    Timing.

    Write about timing. I consider myself fairly decent in the kitchen, for an amateur, but when it's just you and maybe another pair of hands to chop onions, what are some timing tricks?
     
  3. BTT

    BTT Headmaster

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    What are your suggestions for desserts? The big family dinners are for 8 people. I'm looking for something relatively light, which goes well with coffee. Preferably something that can be made the day before (maybe even further in advance) and stored somewhere, whether it's in a fridge or at room temperature.

    I thought about doing tiramisu but that already involves coffee, so I'm not sure if that's the best way to go.
     
  4. Xepheria

    Xepheria The Benefactor

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    I'd echo this, but for roasts in general - roast meats, roast vegetables and the various accoutrements that go with them. It's getting to be winter and I'd like to be able to do a Sunday roast for my flat, and be able to help out around christmas-time with the meal prep.
     
  5. Joe

    Joe The Reminiscent Exile Prestige DLP Supporter

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    Yorkshire puddings! Jamie Oliver has a decent recipe where he adds a dash of nutmeg to the batter. Extra Christmas-y.

    And there's a trick with turkey about stuffing a herb butter under the skin before roasting and covering with bacon. Zombie could likely elaborate more.
     
  6. Zombie

    Zombie John Waynes Teeth Prestige DLP Supporter

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    Nice more reaction than I thought I'd get. Gimme a couple days and I'll have something written up for everyone.
     
  7. Innomine

    Innomine Order Member Prestige DLP Supporter

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    This may or may not work for you, but I’d love some just general tip and tricks, at say a medium/advanced level. Like, what are some things that you’ve learnt for yourself over your career. Not something you’ve been taught. Optimisation, efficiency etc etc.
     
  8. Johnnyseattle

    Johnnyseattle Death Eater DLP Supporter

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    How useful is an Instant Pot? I've never used a pressure cooker, but as they get more in the limelight, they sure sound nifty. Is it just because they're a fad right now, or have I really been missing out?
     
  9. CareOtters

    CareOtters Supreme Mugwump DLP Supporter

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    Gonna echo the timing questions, but with a particular twist: what tips do you have for making the most out of a small kitchen / oven space when trying to make a fancy AF meal with all the trimmings? Thanks to this thread I can now make a ballin' roast dinner, but it'd still be delivered piecemeal over the course of six hours instead of all at once.

    What things lend well to being made the night before and reheated? What can be assembled the day before and then cooked for the first time on the day? What should always, always, don't fuck with it, just always be made fresh on the day?
     
  10. Johnnyseattle

    Johnnyseattle Death Eater DLP Supporter

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    One of the big things for production meals - Thanksgiving, Xmas, Easter style - is to prep everything you can before, and make anything you can ahead. Prepping ingredients cuts a pretty big amount of time off any meal, but it's exponential when you've got 6-8 things to make, and 15 people waiting for it all.

    After that, it's a question of managing cooking surfaces/implements. If I know I've got to have 90-120min for my turkey to be done, My oven can't be used for anything else. So while that's in, anything else I do has to be done somewhere else. So if there's anything else you're doing in the oven, can you par-cook it first? For instance, I cook cubed sweet potatoes and halved brussels sprouts for 30m before the bird goes in, to get them most of the way done. Then, while the bird rests, I can blast them at 450 for 20min and it's all ready to go at the same time, as I've done the cranberry sauce the day before, the mash potatoes are on the stove top, the other veg has been steamed in my rice maker, the dressing has been done the day before and only needs a re-heat, and you get the idea.

    Zombie will probably come and shit all over this, but it works for me. :D
     
  11. Darth_Revan

    Darth_Revan Secret Squirrel Prestige DLP Supporter

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    At the risk of incurring the wrath or purists: Microwaves. Use them.

    A lot of folks stay away from microwaves for the actual cooking, and use them only for reheating yesterday's kung pao chicken. They are, however, dead useful for specific things. What comes to mind immediate for me are potatoes and many vegetables. The reason? Water content. The microwave works by introducing radiated heat into the water molecules in whatever it is you're cooking, so things with a lot of natural water content can be cooked perfectly well, and a lot more quickly, using a microwave.

    A thanksgiving related idea for incorporating your microwave: Twice-Baked Potatoes!

    Instead of baking the potato for upwards of 1 hour, you can microwave it for several minutes (I normally do about....5 or 6, but it depends on the power output of your microwave), and then throw it them in the oven for a few minutes to crisp up the jackets. After that, it's a simple matter of completing the rest of the recipe as-normal, BUT you've shaved off about an hour of cooking time.
     
  12. Zombie

    Zombie John Waynes Teeth Prestige DLP Supporter

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    Sorry for the bump, I'd edit an earlier post, but I can't. Just want to let people know I'm working on this. Some shit came up where I'm only going to be able to be on mobile today, and long posting on mobile is about as bad as cancer. So I'll hopefully have something done by tomorrow.
     
  13. BTT

    BTT Headmaster

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    Thread broken.
     
  14. Zombie

    Zombie John Waynes Teeth Prestige DLP Supporter

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    So, I'll be totally honest. I don't eat a lot of Turkey, so my taste and doneness might be a bit different than your liking, but I think the best, and most effective way to do this is make sure you have prep time. Depending on family size a 12 pound turkey can feed about 8 people, and a 18 pound turkey, can feed about 12 people with servings of about 1.5 pounds (sorry, using shitty American measurements for this guys.)

    I'd suggest frozen, because its your best price per pound, turkey wise. You're paying for a lot of water when you get thawed, or "fresh." There's still a lot of shit that goes into packaging before it gets to you, so its one of those things where YMMV. Up to you. 18 pounds frozen, if you cold thaw, it's going to take about four days before its workable. Be prepared. You can use cold water circulation, but you really want to use moving water for that. In the restaurant we have a rig set up where water cycles back and forth, and I've seen this done on Good Eats before. A lot of what I'm going to say here can and has been said by Alton Brown. So, if you don't want to read what I'm saying, find the good eats episode where he cooks Turkey. If I remember, I'll link it at the end of the post.

    Back to it. Put your Turkey into your fridge, in the bottom and let it sit there for four days and let it thaw. After four days its going to be thawed enough you can work with it. I used to thaw whole pallets of these things. 4 days at the temp of most average temp settings for your fridge (about 32 to 34F optimally). Remove the neck and the guts. You can make gravy out of these if you want to. I usually do, or you can feed them to the animals. Just depends on who likes what. Giblet gravy is a thing though.

    Some heavy duty kitchen shears are going to serve you well, turn the Turkey up, and cut along both side so of the back bone, and then store that with your innards because that can be added to a stock pot or gravy pot. Apply pressure to the turkey, to smash it flat. You're going to hear bones crack, this is good. The goal here is make it flat so that everything cooks evenly and at the same rate. This is called Spatchcock. Its a great way to cook a lot of "whole" things. Like chickens, quail, other game hens.

    I'm going against most traditionalist and saying don't brine your turkey. This adds a lot of moisture to your turkey and makes the meat mushy and inconsistent. You also don't need to brine it because by flattening it, you don't need that moisture buffer that brineing usually gives you.

    So, what I haven't mentioned yet is seasoning. A lot of people will brine and marinade and do whatever. Path of least resistance in my opinion, is just putting a dry rub of your favorite spices on the outside of it.

    In this case, Salt, Sage, Black Pepper Corn, and thyme put into a spice mill and then rubbed onto it, under the skin, on the skin, etc is going to be good.

    Place back into the refridgerator on the elevated rack within a sheet pan so that if it drips it drips, and let it sit for additional four days to dry age. This makes the skin crispier and the flavors of the meat taste better. Plus it gives those seasonings time to penetrate into the meat and draw out some additional moisture a la the salt.

    After the fourth day (you don't have to do a whole four days, but I'd suggest trying to go that long) take it out of the fridge and let it rest for about an hour before you put it in the oven.

    Preheat your oven to 425 F or 218 C and cook for about thirty minutes. At this time, (for those of you that asked about timing) if you want to do some cubed potatoes, carrots, etc. You can put these in the oven as well.

    Turkey in the middle rack, and the veg in the rack just below the turkey. Roast for about 30 minutes before reducing the heat to 350 F (176 C) for another 40 minutes. If you put seasoning on your veg, take that time to mix things up a bit. I usually do sweet potato, carrot, etc with brown sugar, butter, all on the same pan.

    Internal temperature of the thickest part of the turkey should register 155 F (68C). I'd suggest getting a good instant reed probe thermometer. They're a solid investment if you don't have one.

    Also, keep in mind that your cook times my vary. In the last 20 minutes or so of cook time, start temping. Try to stick the same spot each time, and just get it to that 155 F (68C) temperature. That's safe to eat.

    Take it from the oven, let it rest for 30 minutes at minmum before serving.


    Keep in mind when you're making your spice mix (you'll notice I didn't include measurements here) to do it to your taste. But go easy on the salt. The fat under the skin is going to add a lot of flavor and is going to eliminate the need for a lot of salt. If you're looking for a guide line, don't exceed 3 1/2 table spoons.

    Is there a problem with deep frying? No. Not really, this is just easier.


    Total prep time. 8 days 3 hours. 4 for the thawing, 4 for the air drying. 3 for misc. cook, margin of error in regards to thawing dry aging or if you forget. Give or take a few days, just depends on how much time you have to prep.

    Food Safety: If you do the dry aging. Try to keep the turkey in a fridge that doesn't have a lot of use. If you're a bachelor and only have one fridge try to limit your time just standing with the door open to a bare minimum while you're letting it age.


    Timing is one of those things you kind of pick up. For me, timing didn't really come to me until I was at it for a while. You gotta figure that most things when cooking meat, if its large portions is 30 min heat per pound.

    Invest in a timer, set for what you place in last, not what you place in first.
    What I mean by this is that if you put a bird in, and you throw some roasted veg in, they're not always going to have the same cook time. They might cook at the same heat. So I'm gonna cook my veg for 30 min, but I'm gonna cook my 3 pound bird for an hour and a half. Set your time for thirty, turn timer off, reset for an hour when you pull the veg out.

    If you're doing prep. Do a it in advance. I saw a couple people say this. If you're cooking a large meal (if I'm cooking a large meal) have containers of your ingredients prepped and ready. Most things has garlic, Onion, celery, carrot. Onion in first, then garlic, wait three minutes, place celery.

    Carrot can be put in at the start if its a long cook dish like a stew because it will soften quicker, or last if you want some texture to your bite later on. So that's all about personal taste.

    If you have your prepstation right beside your pan, I'd still suggest preping first, and then cooking. There's nothing, and I mean nothing, that says you have to do it all on the fly. Not a single Chef I know, myself included, every does shit on the fly. You get irregular results that way. Celery not cooked, carrot too mushy etc.

    So, really its up to you. Biggest thing is, don't start too many tasks that you can't keep up. But at the same time, if you have only X amount of time, know what your limit is.

    Ideally, if I'm cooking four or five things. That's an entree, and maybe two to three sides, one of those bread. I'll cook the bread first (unless you want it warm -- which you can just put it in the oven before placing on the table) then without letting my oven cool down, if I'm doing roasted veg, I'll prep my meat and do what ever I'm gonna do with that, then throw veg and meat in the oven at the same time. Remove one, let the other finish. Veg isn't going to cook down and you can place lidded on the stove top to keep ambient heat going with little problem.

    If you're doing mash, mash is better if you let it sit a few minutes after cooking. Lot of people go from cube to mash to table in like .3 seconds and that's a no no. You want the flavors to meld in and some of the fats you've added in (usually) to cool down so that you get that good whipped mouth feel).

    Green vegetables, the order of operation on that is usually cook, then blanch then serve. Peas, green beans, etc have short cook time so they can be done in the last few minutes of whatever your main course is and they'll be better because they're a warm, and if you blanch them, they'll be crisp. You're not refrigerating them. You're just reducing cooking temperature. So use ice water.
    Anything more specific, just ask, this is something I could talk endlessly about and is pretty situational.

    So, cakes are going to be your friend here. Or brownies. If you like super sweet, go with brownies, if you like cake, try Tres Leches cake out. Its not bad. I like the flavor, and it goes good with coffee imo. Its also something that the longer it sits (up to a point, the better it gets).

    This is a decent recipe. Its cake, I won't go too much into the semantics of it. They sell box mix for this as well, but from scratch is best so make sure to pay attention to the ingredients list.

    If you have a specific taste let me know and I can be more specific.

    So, to reiterate what I said earlier. Prep in advance. Don't be afraid to double up in the oven. Most standard range tops come with four placements. Make sure you're utilizing all of these to the best of your ability.

    If you want to help out in a group cook environ, make sure that tasks are clearly delineated and that everyone knows what each other is doing so there is no overlap and maximum efficiency.

    What you cook is really up to personal taste. I asked someone the other day, but I've already forgot and can't find it in my logs, but I honestly don't know what goes into a typical English roast dinner. Gimme an idea and I can break it down for you. Sorry if that wasn't more helpful.

    My gut says its a fad. There is some benefit to the instant pot, but its mostly because it makes pressure cooking idiot proof. *

    There is a bunch of hype with the media, so I really don't know how I feel about it. I'd say that you should closely observe common pressure cooker proceadures and give it a try. I've seen a lot of people using them to fairly decent success so there has to be some merit. I honestly don't have one. I'll have to get one and report back here how it works.

    Tried doing some research on it and I just see a bunch of shitty shilling and pintrest sharing and other dumb shit.


    *I say idiot proof, but there is always that one person.


    For a small kitchen, steps remain the same. Use what you have. Don't waste time on things you don't need to and make sure you're using every available surface. As I told Joe up above, the best thing here is making sure you're utilizing your time well, and maximizing your efficiency by using everything you can to cook. They sell counter top single, electric ranges for pretty cheap if you need more stove top space. I'd consider investing in one. Things that you can cook ahead like bread, do so, or have enough made from a prior session that you can reuse in your current meal.

    If you're doing veg, throw it in the oven and let it roast with whatever meat you're cooking. Don't waste stove top space with pan frying vegetables when you can get the same effect with a roast and a broil and it taste better. Heating is more consistent.

    And always, always, prep ahead. Cut your veg, spice, etc before you start cooking. Clean while you're waiting for something in the oven, or be plating while you're waiting for something to be finishing on the stove top.

    Stagger your cook times. Stuff on the stove top that needs to fry or sear cook last, things that need to go in the oven do it early. 30 minutes per pound, depending on the density of the meat.

    Observe your cook temps for doneness and safety. Don't cook for any longer than you need to. A lot of time is wasted on over cooking food and people don't realize that. Safe temperatures are a thing for a reason. They maximize flavor, consistency and safety all in one go.

    What kind of small space we talking about here?


    I honestly agree with this. A potato takes an hour plus in the oven. It takes about 8 minutes on average in the microwave. Just make sure you've poked some holes in it so it can vent. The other thing with potatoes and microwaves it that the skins can get tough if you let them go too long, so depending on your wattage (most are 1200 or so) do about 5 minutes, check for doneness adjust follow up time for desired inside consistency. Scrub with water, wrap with paper towel, to keep hydrated, plus create a localized steaming effect for maximum efficiency.

    Hopefully I addressed everyone that asked something, if I didn't, sorry, remind me what you said and I'll answer. Everyone else, great questions guys I really appreciate it. I hope you have some great follow up. Looking forward to it.
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2018
  15. Darth_Revan

    Darth_Revan Secret Squirrel Prestige DLP Supporter

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    Great advice! Thanks.

    I am curious, though, do you have recommendations for a non-Spatchcocked method? I understand the merits as far as cooking the bird, but it does kind of ruin the traditional presentation.

    Edit: I thought of a new question:

    We've been asking a lot about how to cook, but I'm curious to know what you cook with. That is to say, what are your opinions on the various types of pots and pans, what sort of implements do you think you couldn't do without, etc.?
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2018
  16. Teyrn

    Teyrn High Inquisitor

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    FWIW got my dad an instant pot a week or two ago, sort of an early Christmas present. (They were on sale 40% off at the time)

    He's made roast beef, teriyaki chicken, etc. in it. My brother apparently also got one and Sis-in-law has been using it pretty often for everything from Spaghetti to Egg bakes apparently.

    General consensus has been that it's fairly easy to use/prep. the meal. The meat comes out 'fall off the bone' tender, and very tasty.
    He also likes it because it cooks a fair bit faster than doing some stuff in the oven.


    tl;dr: It's convenient, fairly good for what it does, but it's not going to replace your stove/oven for everything. There's a decent number of recipe's at recipes.instantpot.com if you want to get an idea of what you can do in them.
     
  17. CareOtters

    CareOtters Supreme Mugwump DLP Supporter

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    What secret ingredients/techniques could I use to transcend the realm of mortal flavour in spaghetti Bolognese?

    Simple dish but I need to really thrash a little ginger dude in a cook off - humiliate him so badly he only eats takeout for the rest of his life and never cooks again.
     
  18. Johnnyseattle

    Johnnyseattle Death Eater DLP Supporter

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  19. Nevermind

    Nevermind Professor

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    When I actually make the effort to go all out and make Bolognese sause myself (about two or three times a year) I tend to add just a tiny bit of freshly grated parmesan to my sauce every time I stir it. I genuinely can‘t tell if it has an actual effect or just a placebo one, but I like to imagine that it comes together a little better for it.

    I use a variation of this recipe from the BBC food section. I tend to add a bit more more bacon or an extra clove of garlic, depending on my mood. And the mushrooms are very much optional.
     
  20. Socialist

    Socialist Professor

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    Ahhh, I've experimented quite a bit with this recipe. After many, many, many applications I settled at the best incarnation being the authentic, traditional ragu bolognese.

    How does the authentic recipe differ from a tomato meat sauce?

    - No ground beef. Traditional recipe uses small pieces of cubed beef that is slowly cooked for a lot of hours until it breaks down.

    - No spaghetti. Bolognese works best with a wider type of pasta, like papardelle or tagliatelle.

    - Few seasonings/aromatics. At most a little garlic, a bay leaf and a stick of cinnamon (optional). No thyme/rosemary.

    - Not a ton of tomato. This is a meat sauce with some tomato, not the opposite.

    - You cannot substitute any trick for a long cooking time. Accept that the best result will take approx. 4 to 5 hours (but only 35-40 minutes of work, the rest is waiting)


    Ingredients:


    3.5 - 4 pounds of good quality chuck, cubed (size of cubes increases/lowers cooking time, make sure the pieces are as uniform as possible. Also don't buy cubed meat, get one or two whole pieces and cube it yourself to guarantee freshness)

    200g of fatty pork product, diced [This can be bacon. If you don't want smoked tones, use pancetta or cured pork belly. You can even use raw pork belly (I use this), in that case double to 400g and increase the salt you add a bit].

    2 medium onions, chopped

    2 carrots, grated

    2 sticks of celery, diced

    2 garlic cloves, diced (optional, I use this like 50% of the time. Still ambivalent)

    120-140 ml red wine (Something drinkable, don't use cooking wine! You can also use white here, but red works best. Preferably use the wine you'll be drinking with the meal)

    2 cups of (preferably home made) beef stock

    2 cups of (preferably home made) chicken stock

    2 pieces of lightly roasted beef bone, with the marrow (this is optional and a bit of hassle, but it adds wonderful flavor. I only add this at very special occasions)

    2 cans (28 oz each) of good quality tomatoes. Preferably whole tomatoes that you'll crush by hand.

    150 ml of whole milk

    140 grams of tomato paste

    2 bay leaves

    1 cinnamon stick (optional)

    50 ml olive oil (if not using any pork, upp this to 75 ml and add 30-40 gr of butter)

    salt & pepper to taste


    The making of:


    (before starting, make sure all your ingredients are prepared, sliced, diced and close)

    1. Begin by placing a large pot (preferably a cast iron dutch oven that you can put in the oven later) on the flame. You want high-ish heat here. Wait for 1-2 minutes and add the olive oil. Give it another minute or so and add your meat.

    It's not necessary to brown the meat in batches here, put it all in. Stir every couple of minutes. If you're using pork (as you should) add it at this point. You want to saute the meat for 10 minutes until it's colored and you've got a fond going. Stir frequently, but not constantly.

    2. Once your meat is colored, it's time to add the onion, carrot and celery. Stir well and give it 5 minutes. Then add your garlic, if using, and saute (1 minute), add your tomato paste and saute (2 minutes), then your wine (let most of it evaporate), then the milk (2-3 minutes) and finally your 4 cups of stock.

    It goes without saying but you should stir every time you add a new ingredient.

    If using beef bones, throw them in at this point.

    3. After you've added everything in the previous step, wait for the whole thing to come to a boil. Once it has, it's time to add the tomatoes (rinse the cans with some water and add that too), the bay leaves and cinnamon stick. Stir well until everything is incorporated.

    (You can add more tomato sauce here if you want a more red end result. Reduce the stock you add by the amount of tomato sauce you add, in that case)

    Now is the time to add your salt and pepper. The amount will depend on whether you used bacon and whether your beef/chicken stock has salt or not (it shouldn't).

    I generally go with 10 gr of salt for every 2 pounds of meat+vegetables. However, salt is the easiest thing to fuck up in a recipe and ruin your shit. So add about 10 gr at this point and proceed with the cooking. A couple of hours later taste and adjust.

    The pepper is up to you. Don't add a ton as it can become overpowering.

    4. Once your sauce has come to a boil it's time to begin the slow cooking process. You have two options here, either continue on the stove, or in the oven. The oven is superior, for my tastes.

    If you're going with the stove, reduce the heat until the ragu is slowly bubbling (2 of 10). Leave the pot uncovered.

    If going with the oven, preheat to 140 C (or 280 F) and put the pot in. Place the lid on ajar, so steam can escape.

    5. Cook for 3.5 to 4 hours. You want to stir this every 30-40 minutes. Don't stir more often as heat will escape the oven. (you're using the oven, right?). Remember to taste for salt around 2 hours in and adjust if necessary.

    6. After 4 hours have passed the house should smell like the stairway to heaven. Remove the pot from the heat.

    The sauce should be a dark red/brown color, most of the water should have evaporated and the sides of the pot should be full of caramelized goodness (scrape that stuff with a wooden spoon and add it to the sauce!). The consistency should be thick, a little thinner than paste almost (this is due to the gelatin and collagen breaking down).

    Remove your bones and if necessary push the marrow into the sauce and stir.

    The meat should be falling apart and it should be ready to pull apart into fibers (which is what you want). Use a potato masher or large fork to break it apart (it should break very easily). Alternatively you can remove all the meat with a strainer, pull it apart with 2 forks and re-add it to the sauce.

    Once the meat is pulled stir well.

    7. 10 minutes before you do the above, it's time to get your pasta going.

    [Do yourself a favor and get high quality pasta. If you can get fresh papardelle or tagliatele from a deli or super market that would be ideal. Otherwise get good quality dry. Under no circumstances use spaghetti, an italian agent will murder you]

    If using fresh, throw in boiling salted water for 2 minutes.

    If dry, undercook the pasta by 2 minutes of what the instructions say.

    Strain the pasta and reserve 2 cups of the cooking water.

    Under no circumstances should you rinse the pasta.


    Serving:

    At this point you have your ragu ready, you've just strained your pasta and reserved the pasta water.

    You can also grate some parmesan [optional and I'm ambivalent about this too. On one hand, it brings out the flavors. On the other it can overpower and the ragu is already a flavor bomb. If you do use it, don't add too much and get some parmigiano reggiano, not generic parm. If you use pre-grated parm, an italian agent will once again dismember you]

    Take a wide pan and put it on a medium flame. For every person you're serving add to the pan one ladle of sauce, 110 g of pasta (who are we kidding, go with 150) and a couple of tablespoons of pasta water. Also add a bit of parmesan (optional). Stir everything gently with a wooden spatula for 1-2 minutes, until a glorious mess forms. The sauce should cling to the pasta and the whole thing should not be runny, but thick and glossy. If it's too thick add a bit more pasta water.

    Then take your bowls or deep plates (ideally warmed up).

    Add one serving from the pan to each bowl.

    Add an additional full ladle of ragu on top.

    Add a few drops of olive oil on top of the ragu.

    Add parmesan (optional)

    Add a tiny bit of very finely cut parsley (optional, but it cuts down the richness a bit. You decide)

    Add a couple twists of freshly cut black pepper.

    Serve with red/white wine (same you used in the ragu), garlic bread and a green salad.


    Conclusion:

    This is absolutely the best dish I've ever cooked or probably will ever cook. People I've served this to have said they'd literally never tasted anything like this at any point in their whole life. My grandma, rest her soul, told me she never thought a pasta dish could taste like this.

    Above recipe makes enough ragu for 8 to 10 people. It freezes very well (just place frozen ragu in a pan with a little water and stir for 10-15 minutes until it's a sauce again).

    Enjoy.
     
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