1. Hi there, Guest

    Only registered users can really experience what DLP has to offer. Many forums are only accessible if you have an account. Why don't you register?
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Q4 2019 Story Competition is kicking off!

    Prompt:
    Foreign Magical Regions (Setting outside of Britain)
    Get writing Folks!
    Dismiss Notice

Culinary Ask a Chef: Or Zombie explains Cooking

Discussion in 'The Burrow' started by Zombie, Aug 25, 2017.

Loading...
  1. Joe

    Joe The Reminiscent Exile ~ Prestige ~ DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2008
    Messages:
    765
    Location:
    Canberra, ACT
    High Score:
    1,800
    OK, I've got 2kgs of chicken breast, a bag of carrots, and six large bell peppers (2 x green, 2 x red, 2 x yellow) to use tonight - what am I making in surplus to store and freeze for the next two weeks? Recipes involving the listed ingridients?
     
  2. Shouldabeenadog

    Shouldabeenadog Auror

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2010
    Messages:
    655
    Location:
    California
    Try a rice dish. Brown the chicken with some spices, like Chile powder. Add some stock or wine to deglaze. cook vegetables with even more spices in that until soft, then add chicken and add 2.5 cups white rice and enough stock or broth to cover, cook until rice is done, stirring every 5 minutes, add more lowered of you need, you want a grits/oatmeal/risotto consistency.
     
  3. Nuhuh

    Nuhuh Dastardly Shadow Admin Retired Staff

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2006
    Messages:
    2,076
    Location:
    USA
    Why does my food burn every time I use my stainless steel skillet? What does it take to grow up and not be a filthy non stick cookware user.
     
  4. Zombie

    Zombie John Waynes Teeth Moderator DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2007
    Messages:
    5,006
    Use lubrication. Its like woman, can't just ram it in. You gotta foreplay first.
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2019
  5. 9th Doctor

    9th Doctor Seventh Year

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2013
    Messages:
    297
    I’m trying to incorporate liver into my diet. I’ve tried cow liver, and it tastes and smells terrible.

    How should I be cooking it so it’s not? Should I be using chicken liver?

    I have cooked it on cast iron with butter and onion and a bit of bacon.

    I’m thinking Pate as an option. Any advice? Help me Zombie-Wan Kenobi. You’re my only hope.
     
  6. Nuhuh

    Nuhuh Dastardly Shadow Admin Retired Staff

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2006
    Messages:
    2,076
    Location:
    USA
    Chicken liver is softer, cooks fast, and imo tastes better. Unfortunately, the smells is still there, much like cow liver. The cure, as best as can be, is cooking with aromatics such as ginger & garlic & lemon juice, throw some white onions in there. They will reduce the smell but will not cancel it. Upside is that all those ingredients make any food delicious, and liver absorbs that flavor like no other.
     
  7. Zombie

    Zombie John Waynes Teeth Moderator DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2007
    Messages:
    5,006
    Pate sure. Chicken livers are good fried up but any other way is gross tbh. Beef liver is the most common way to eat it in most places and all I can say is use lots of spice, bake it instead of pan frying and use some kind of breading. Or just eat an iron supplement if you wanna taste iron rich food.

    There's a reason it's not a more popular.

    Chicken livers are meant to be breaded and fried and then consumed hot as fucking lava.
     
  8. Jax

    Jax First Year

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2015
    Messages:
    23
    Gender:
    Male
    At the last bistro I worked at, we served veal liver with a salad very high on acidity to balance the iron in the liver. Also, and this is a personal preference, pan seared liver should be almost completely raw in the middle - think in the terms of scallops. But no matter your cooking preference, veal is definitely more palatable compared to beef.
     
  9. kelkorkesis

    kelkorkesis Second Year

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2017
    Messages:
    53
    High Score:
    0
    It triggers my national sensibilities that yogurt is called Greek yogurt. I would give baklava to Greeks before yogurt but I digress.

    Here is cacik (or you might be familiar with tzatziki). While following recipe list bunch of ingredients, you can make a poor student version of it with some yogurt, cucumber and salt. It goes well with a lot of food.
    https://www.thespruceeats.com/cacik-turkish-yogurt-with-cucumbers-herbs-3274166

    Or if you want something to drink with food ayran is very fast and easy drink to prepare. My mother always prepares from leftover yogurt.
    https://www.akitcheninistanbul.com/recipe/ayran-turkish-yoghurt-drink/
     
  10. wox2d

    wox2d Sixth Year

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2018
    Messages:
    177
    Gender:
    Male
    lmao I don't care it's yogurt
     
  11. MonkeyEpoxy

    MonkeyEpoxy Prisoner DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2011
    Messages:
    2,758
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Colorado
    You realize it's not called greek yogurt just fuckin because, right? if it's strained three times instead of two to get rid of the liquid (plus more milk, right?) it's greek yogurt.
     
  12. Marsupial

    Marsupial Headmaster DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2008
    Messages:
    1,055
    I'm also quite fond of Greek coffee and loukoumi if that makes you feel any better.
     
  13. kelkorkesis

    kelkorkesis Second Year

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2017
    Messages:
    53
    High Score:
    0
    I was joking. It is a meme. I never liked Turkish/Greek coffee though. I prefer latte. It is also interesting to see someone enjoys lokum. I heard many tales of disappointment of eating one after getting hyped about it in Narnia. If you can get I suggest double roasted lokum, it is much better than regular ones.
     
  14. Chilli

    Chilli Seventh Year DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    May 27, 2006
    Messages:
    241
    Gender:
    Female
    @wox2d
    If you don't mind getting some extra ingredients here's something nice and easy:

    500gr greek yogurt (1 lb is ~450gr, so just a bit over a pound. It doesn't have to be exact)
    500gr feta cheese, crumbled
    5 eggs, lightly beaten
    1 cup all purpose flour + 1tsp baking powder, or 1 cup self-rising flour
    250gr butter
    ground black pepper to taste
    ground nutmeg to taste
    breadcrumbs

    Preheat the oven at 190C (375F).
    In a large bowl, mix everything but the breadcrumbs by hand.
    Pour the mix in a pan. I usually use one that is 14x9in (35x22cm) but it can be larger or smaller. Any thickness between half and one inch is fine; just adjust the baking time
    Spread a thin layer of breadcrumbs on top.
    Bake for about 30 minutes.

    The recipe doesn't call for salt because the cheese is usually salty enough.
    I refrigerate it a couple of hours after it's cooled and heat it up a bit when I want. It's fine at room temperature as well.
     
  15. Marsupial

    Marsupial Headmaster DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2008
    Messages:
    1,055
    I mean, the reply was a joke as well, but I guess that sort dry, prodding sarcasm doesn't come through terribly well in text.

    I love the coffee, regardless of whose nationality gets attached to it. In Greece it's Greek, in Turkey it's Turkish, the previous city I lived in here in the US had a great little Levantine restaurant run by Syrian expats with 'Syrian coffee'. For the most part it's all the same except the name. At least in restaurants in the USA, I've had marginally better luck with coffee labeled as "Turkish" than I have "Greek". The ones labeled as Turkish seem to be more likely to have a bit of cardamom in them here, and if I'm ordering that style of coffee I want the cardamom to be there.

    As for loukoumi/lokum... I've had pistachio and walnut versions which are genuinely delicious, and some citrus flavours are pretty good. The floral stuff (rose in particular) I really actively dislike. But then I actively dislike rose flavour in damn near anything, so it's hardly the loukoumi's fault... particularly given I think I could eat my weight in the pistachio flavoured ones.
     
  16. kelkorkesis

    kelkorkesis Second Year

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2017
    Messages:
    53
    High Score:
    0
    Coffee is originated from Yemen, and became very popular over Ottoman ruled territories. Everyone had some twist with it - spices, preparation - but as you say Greek/Turkish/Syrian coffee is all the same.

    Western people tend to dislike rose flavoured stuff. We have also deserts and jam made from rose. I especially like rose jam, it is my second favourate after peach.

    On a side note, if you happen to buy lokum from Turkey, Hacı Bekir Lokumu is the best you can get. They are apparently doing it since 1777, and since our currency is terrible you can buy a lot for a pittance.
     
Loading...