1. Hi there, Guest

    Only registered users can really experience what DLP has to offer. Many forums are only accessible if you have an account. Why don't you register?
    Dismiss Notice

Culinary Christmas Food

Discussion in 'The Burrow' started by Oment, Dec 2, 2017.

  1. Oment

    Oment The Betrayer

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2011
    Messages:
    1,977
    It's that time of year again, and what better way to celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ than by stuffing yourself to the gills with delicious food. Post all your appetisers, main courses, and 'oh God this is yummy but I am way too full already' desserts here.

    OP does not start, because OP is a male bachelor with no alive parents or any siblings, ergo I have nobody to show off for. (And I am also looking for ideas.)
     
  2. Zombie

    Zombie John Waynes Teeth Prestige DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2007
    Messages:
    2,051
    High Score:
    2,094
    I can give you recipes for Chinese food. My people never did pagan rituals so I don't have any recipes for you
     
  3. Oment

    Oment The Betrayer

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2011
    Messages:
    1,977
    The most attachment I have to Christmas is the decoration on Main Street (equivalents) looking pretty in that once-a-decade snow we get around here, so... Chinese away, I'd say.
     
  4. KHAAAAAAAN!!

    KHAAAAAAAN!! Troll in the Dungeon Prestige DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2011
    Messages:
    1,640
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Under your bed.
    High Score:
    2,002
    Christmas food is so lackluster compared to Thanksgiving food. Who would want a lump of ham over a giant butter/herb coated turkey?

    Also, Christmas fruitcake can go fuck itself.
     
  5. wordhammer

    wordhammer Supreme Mugwump DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2010
    Messages:
    1,643
    Location:
    In the wood room, somewhere flat
    One from my wife's family. They make it every year.

     
  6. Sorrows

    Sorrows Unspeakable Prestige DLP Gold Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2008
    Messages:
    737
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Edinburgh
    High Score:
    1,819

    You eat ham for Christmas? In the Uk it's always turkey.
     
  7. Poytin

    Poytin The Arby's Hipster DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2008
    Messages:
    1,070
    Location:
    Nevada
    It has to do with it's relative nearness to American Thanksgiving. I'm personally a fan of doing a turkey for both but that's me.

    However for the last 7 years or so since I took over Thanksgiving cooking and my dad does the Christmas stuff it's been traditional Thanksgiving for that and then on Christmas my dad makes steak(Type of steak depending on how successful hunting was that year) and fried potatoes.
     
  8. Skykes

    Skykes Minister of Magic DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    May 14, 2006
    Messages:
    1,336
    Location:
    Ireland
    In my family we do Chicken, Turkey & Ham. But there is 10 of us usually (8 kids 2 parents).
     
  9. KHAAAAAAAN!!

    KHAAAAAAAN!! Troll in the Dungeon Prestige DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2011
    Messages:
    1,640
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Under your bed.
    High Score:
    2,002
    Yeah. I don't know. People still do turkey. But the bigger, meatier birds are usually gone from supermarkets after Thanksgiving. Only little ones or just breasts are typically left for Christmas. Perhaps the mainstream American thing just evolved to be ham or a beef roast because of that, or perhaps the lack of good turkeys available stemmed from more people going for ham and beef. I couldn't tell you.
     
  10. Xiph0

    Xiph0 Administrator Admin

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2005
    Messages:
    8,987
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    People's Republic of California
    I just start incorporating thyme and rosemary into more of my meat dishes. Makes it feel like Fall and the holidays.
     
  11. Marsupial

    Marsupial Headmaster DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2008
    Messages:
    1,008
    You shut your mouth; ham is goddamn amazing. I'd swap out the Thanksgiving turkey for another ham if I thought I could get away with it.
     
  12. Thaumologist

    Thaumologist Chief Warlock

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2011
    Messages:
    1,592
    Location:
    Chester, England
    Not really recipes, so much as plans...

    Christmas dinner (at lunch) is the standard - turkey, pigs in blankets, roasties, gravy, parsnips, other stuff. Then left out to pick over during the afternoon, although keeping some aside.

    Boxing day lunch is Christmas Pizzas. We've got a wood fired pizza oven on the patio, so we mix up some dough, and then have all the best bits on a home made pizza. Boxing day dinner is, recently, everything in tortillas.

    Then chuck the leftover turkey into a pot, and make up the annual batch of turkey curry,
     
  13. Warlocke

    Warlocke Prisoner

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2006
    Messages:
    2,910
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    The armpit of Ohio
    Unfortunately, with the way they raise the average pig these days, ham used to be better.

    Turkey was never any good. ;)

    I'll be concentrating on cookies and candy, because that's real Christmas food. Starting off, here's a recipe that's so fast and easy, an unexpected guest could call from the end of the driveway, and you can have this done before they get through the front door (well, minus the cooling). Warning: They're cookies in name only.

    Cornflake Cookies
    1 6oz pkg Butterscotch chips
    3 tbsp peanut butter
    3 cups cornflakes

    (These instructions are for making it on a stove, but we've always just used the microwave for this. It's easy enough to extrapolate; just make sure to stir it every so often.)

    Melt the chips and peanut butter in a pan over medium heat. Stir until smooth. Remove from heat and stir in the cereal. Drop mixture by the spoonful onto waxed paper. Cool until firm.
    Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus... and he uses imperial measurements. Blame the elves: Their union refuses to switch. The next recipe is a cookie we don't actually make at Christmas time, but don't let that stop you...

    Okay, before we start, I'm going to level with you... This is an old recipe, from a time when Reese's Cups came one way: Two Reese's Cups in a pack, and they were regular-sized because there only was one size; that's why the ingredients say "5 packages." Now we have whole bags of mini Reese's Cups, tiny Reese's Cups made specifically for baking into cookies, Big Cups, Reese's Cups with Reese's Pieces in them, and one-pound packs of two giant novelty Reese's Cups for Christmas gifts. If you want my advice, just get a bag of the mini ones (they're all over the place at Christmas... and every other day of the year) and chop them into quarters or whatever - and add as many as you can stand it takes. The tiny ones meant for baking have a different shape and chocolate-to-peanut-butter ratio which I believe lead to... less desirable results in this case.

    They're large, chocolate, chocolate-chip, cookies with chunks of Reese's Cups in them, and they are bad for you... but delicious.

    Chocolate Peanut-Butter-Cup Cookies
    2 & 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
    1/3 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
    1 tsp baking soda
    1/2 tsp salt
    1 cup butter or margarine, softened
    3/4 cup smooth peanut butter (because we aren't barbarians)
    3/4 cup light brown sugar, firmly packed
    3/4 cup granulated sugar
    1 tsp vanilla extract
    2 large eggs
    5 2oz packages peanut butter cups cut into 8 pieces
    1 6oz package semisweet chocolate chips

    Heat oven to 350° F. In medium-sized bowl combine flour, cocoa powder, baking soda, and salt; set aside. In large bowl with electric mixer at medium speed, beat butter, peanut butter, brown sugar, granulated sugar, and vanilla about 3 minutes until light and fluffy. Add eggs, one at a time; beat until thoroughly blended after each addition. Reduce speed to low; gradually beat in flour mixture until smooth. Stir peanut-butter-cup pieces into dough along with chocolate chips. Drop dough, 3 tablespoonfuls per cookie, onto ungreased large cookie sheets, spacing about 1 inch apart. Bake 13 to 15 minutes until dry and slightly firm to the touch. Let cookies cool 1 minute on cookie sheets; using a wide spatula, remove to wire racks to cool completely. Makes about 2 dozen cookies.​

    I'll be back with more later (some of it won't even require peanut butter), including some fudge recipes that aren't for the easily annoyed: Fudge is a harsh mistress, and can be just as prone to mixed and lackluster results as a certain Minister of Magic.

    TIP: If you're using baking powder or baking soda in a recipe, please make sure there are no lumps in it! Sift it if you have to, get a mortar and pestle- smash it with a book, I don't care. Nothing ruins your eating experience like biting into a disgusting lump of baking soda/powder that makes your face turn inside-out when you taste it.
     
  14. Zombie

    Zombie John Waynes Teeth Prestige DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2007
    Messages:
    2,051
    High Score:
    2,094
  15. Warlocke

    Warlocke Prisoner

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2006
    Messages:
    2,910
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    The armpit of Ohio
    These are somewhat similar cookies, but we make both for Christmas because they're awesome.

    Hazelnut Crinkles
    Makes about 4 dozen

    3/4 cup granulated sugar
    3/4 cup Nutella
    1/2 cup butter or margarine, softened
    1/2 tsp vanilla extract
    1 egg
    1 & 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
    1 tsp baking soda
    1/4 tsp salt
    - - -
    3 tbsp white course (decorating) sugar crystals or granulated sugar

    Heat oven to 375°. Beat granulated sugar, Nutella, butter, vanilla, and egg in large bowl with electric mixer on medium speed, or mix with spoon. Stir in flour, baking soda, and salt.
    Shape dough by rounded teaspoonfuls into 1-inch balls. Roll in sugar crystals. Place about 2 inches apart on ungreased cookie sheet.
    Bake 7 to 9 minutes or until puffed and edges are set. Cool on cookie sheet 1 minute. Remove from cookie sheet to wire rack; cool.

    -----

    Ginger Cookies
    Makes about 4 dozen

    2 cups all-purpose flour
    3/4 tsp baking soda
    1/4 tsp salt
    2 tsp ground ginger
    1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
    1/8 tsp ground cloves
    1/2 cup butter, softened
    1 cup course, raw, sugar (Sugar In The Raw)
    1 egg
    1/4 cup dark corn syrup (regular corn syrup is fine, it's what we use)
    - - -
    1/3 to 1/2 cup course, raw, sugar (Sugar In The Raw)

    Combine flour, baking soda, salt, ginger, cinnamon, and cloves in a medium bowl and set aside. Beat butter and 1 cup course sugar in a large bowl with mixer at medium high speed until well mixed. Beat in egg and corn syrup until smooth. Stir in flour mixture.
    Chill dough 1 to 2 hours or until easy to handle.
    Shape dough into 1-inch balls and roll in 1/3 to 1/2 cup course sugar. Place balls 2 inches apart on greased baking sheets (instructions unclear, mounted the cookie sheet).
    Bake in preheated 350° oven for 9 to 11 minutes or just until golden around edges. Cool on wire racks.
    The ginger cookies sometimes have a tendency to turn rather hard after a while. They're still delicious, but maybe consider dunking them in something instead of spending your Christmas shopping money at the dentist. If you don't like ginger snaps, you'll probably like these; they're pretty mild. If you're expecting something so sharp it bites back... don't.

    The funny thing is that the first recipe actually avoided brand names, to the extent of calling Nutella "hazelnut spread with cocoa," while the second recipe crammed specific brands in for everything from the spices to the butter. :p
     
  16. Warlocke

    Warlocke Prisoner

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2006
    Messages:
    2,910
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    The armpit of Ohio
    Double-posting with impunity!

    Raspberry Meringues
    3 dozen

    3 egg whites, room temperature
    1/4 tsp cream of tartar
    dash salt
    3/4 cup sugar
    1/4 cup raspberry preserves
    5 to 6 drops red food color

    Heat oven to 225°F. Cover cookie sheets with parchment paper. In small bowl, beat egg whites, cream of tartar, and salt until soft peaks form. Gradually add sugar, beating until very stiff peaks form (not on you, on the mixture), about 10 minutes. Add raspberry preserves and food color; beat 1 minute at highest speed (not... never mind). Drop teaspoonfuls of meringue mixture or pipe the mixture into 1-inch mounds onto paper-lined cookie sheets.

    Bake at 225°F for 2 hours. Cool completely in cool dry place. Remove from paper.​

    These release from the paper pretty easily if they're dry enough. They also keep pretty well, as long as they're kept cool and dry... but if you try to keep them too long they'll turn to chewy, nasty, blobs. I suppose one could substitute other flavors for the raspberry, but I haven't tried it. As the recipe says, you can just drop spoonfuls of the stuff onto a sheet, but I use a decorator. A piping bag or what have you would work just fine.

    -----

    All-Occasion Cookies
    Uh, you're going to get about 8 dozen cookies if you use a cookie press. Hope you're hungry...

    1lb (4 sticks) butter or margarine, divided (do not use vegetable oil spreads)
    2 & 3/4 cups (11 oz) all-purpose flour
    1 package (18.25 ounces) white cake mix
    Optional: Whatever you feel like decorating them with.

    Preheat oven to 350°F. In small bowl, microwave 2 sticks of the butter on high 1 minute or until melted. Slice remaining butter into 1/2-inch pieces; add to melted butter, tossing to coat. Allow butter to stand 3-5 minutes or until softened.
    Meanwhile, in a large bowl, add flour to cake mix and blend well with a whisk to break up any large lumps.
    Whisk butter until smooth and free of lumps. If necessary, return butter to microwave for 10-20 seconds or until creamy and pourable. Do not melt completely. Pour butter, all at once, into dry ingredients. Mix until dry ingredients are incorporated and dough smooth. (If dough is too stiff to stir, knead until smooth by hand.)

    You can use this dough for pressed cookies, cut-out cookies, drop cookies... bake 15-17 minutes (18-22 for larger drop cookies), until very light golden brown.

    For chocolate cookies, substitute devil's food cake mix for the white cake mix.

    For spice cookies, substitute yellow cake mix for the white cake mix and add 1 tbsp of cinnamon.

    For peanut butter cookies, substitute yellow cake mix for the white cake mix. Add flour as directed. Whisk 2/3 cup peanut butter into softened butter until smooth; add dry ingredients as directed.​

    We've only used this recipe for making cookies with a cookie press, using the white cake mix. If you couldn't tell from the list of ingredients, there is a ton of butter in this dough! I will warn you right now, the longer/more you work this dough over, the more the butter will separate from it, making it Snape greasy and hard to manage ("20 points from Gryffindor!"). Either work fast, or chill the dough occasionally so it doesn't separate. Also, because of the tremendous amount of butter in them, do not bake them too long: Butter is rather fond of burning.

    The recipe says "very light golden brown" but I would go so far as to say that you could safely remove them from the oven at the slightest hint of color at the bottom edges, and still be fine. If the cookies try to crumble when you remove them from the sheet, leave them in the oven a little longer. The taste isn't improved that much by leaving them in until they are "well done" and the high butter content means it's very easy to burn the bottoms.

    I usually separate the dough into three portions, leaving one alone and coloring the remaining two red and green. This takes a generous bit of paste/gel (the liquid food color isn't terribly effective with this), since the colors fade in the oven. If you color your dough, it may be harder to tell when they're getting brown, so keep an eye on them. If you're using a cookie press, form the three colors into long noodles and twist them together, before putting them into the press. I'm no artist and I'm certainly not a baker, but the results are pretty neat (if a bit chaotic).

    Cookie press designs usually don't provide much surface area to decorate, but if you want to add a little colored sugar, you might try misting some water onto the cookies so the sugar will stick instead of rolling off... before you bake them, of course.

    My mother likes to have them with a hot cup of tea.
    My brother insists they taste like Play-Doh, but that doesn't stop him from eating them.

    -----

    Maple Fudge
    Makes 64.

    3 cups packed brown sugar
    1 can (5oz, about 2/3 cup) evaporated milk (NOT condensed)
    1/4 cup butter or margarine, at room temperature
    1 tsp vanilla extract
    1 tsp maple extract
    1 cup of walnut pieces, chopped (if you're a schmuck who can't handle the purity of unadulterated fudge)

    Line an 8-inch square baking pan with foil; lightly grease foil. Mix sugar and milk in a heavy 3-quart saucepan; add butter. Bring to a boil, stirring constantly, over medium heat. Boil, without stirring, 3 minutes or until candy thermometer registers 234° to 240° F. (soft-ball stage) when small amount dropped into very cold water forms a soft ball that flattens when removed from water. Remove from heat and let stand in pan, without stirring, until warm, 110°F. With a wooden spoon beat in remaining ingredients until well blended. Spread evenly in prepared pan. Refrigerate about 8 hours until firm enough to cut. Lift foil by ends onto cutting board. Cut into 1-inch squares

    Microwave method: Mix sugar and milk in a 3-quart microwave-safe bowl. Add butter. Microwave uncovered on high 4&1/2 to 5 minutes, stirring once, until mixture begins to boil; stir. Microwave on high without stirring, 3 to 3&1/2 minutes to soft-ball stage. Proceed as directed.​

    -----

    Peanut-Butter Fudge
    Makes about 2 pounds fudge or 36 pieces.

    1 16oz package light brown sugar
    1 5.33oz can evaporated milk (NOT condensed)
    4 tbsp butter or margarine (1/2 stick)
    1 tsp cider vinegar
    1 tsp vanilla extract
    1 12oz jar peanut butter (you can use chunky peanut butter if you're a schmuck who can't handle the purity of unadulterated fudge)

    Butter 8 by 8-inch baking pan; set aside.
    In heavy 3-quart saucepan, mix brown sugar, undiluted evaporated milk, butter/margarine, and vinegar; over medium-low heat, heat to boiling, stirring constantly. Set candy thermometer in place and continue cooking, without stirring until temperature reaches 238°F, or soft-ball stage (when small amount dropped into very cold water forms a soft ball that flattens when removed from water). Remove saucepan from heat.
    With wooden spoon, beat until mixture begins to thicken and cool slightly. Stir in vanilla extract and peanut butter until well blended. Pour into pan. Refrigerate until firm. When cold, cut into 6 strips, then cut each strip crosswise into 6 pieces. Store fudge in tightly covered container.

    Microwave method: Butter 8 by 8-inch pan; set aside. In 3-quart casserole or bowl, mix brown sugar, undiluted evaporated milk, butter or margarine, and vinegar. Cook on high 5 minutes until mixture begins to boil around the edge, stirring once. Stir mixture until smooth. Carefully set microwave-safe candy thermometer in place and continue cooking on high, without stirring, 4 to 5 & 1/2 minutes until temperature reaches 238°F, or soft-ball stage. Complete recipe as directed.​

    Wow, you can tell how old some recipes are, depending on what size they think a can/bag/package of something is. Everything is smaller and more expensive now. Pay more attention to the measurement than the "1 can/bag/package" thing.

    Aaaaand hopefully I haven't introduced a fatal typo into these recipes anywhere.
    Our ginger cookies are half gone and Christmas is a week away. o_O
     
  17. Warlocke

    Warlocke Prisoner

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2006
    Messages:
    2,910
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    The armpit of Ohio
    Triple-posting like a boss!

    Here's a mediocre pic of mediocre-looking cookies (we ain't artists, folks).

    Envelope Cookies
    Supposedly yields 25. Makes a piddling little amount, double the recipe.

    1&1/4 cups all-purpose flour
    3oz cream cheese, softened
    1/2 cup butter, softened
    Your choice of filling

    The original filling for this recipe was ghastly... and lost to the ages. We use raspberry/apricot/strawberry preserves, and nut dessert filling*, and I think we may have even used poppy seed filling, decades ago. My misanthropic brother put homemade basil preserves in some, once, but one follows his example at their own risk. If it sounds good, just shove it in there.

    In bowl, combine flour, cream cheese, and butter, knead until well blended.
    Now eat that shit, you little piglet.
    Shape into a ball and refrigerate. (You'll probably need to let it warm up a bit when you get ready to use it, as it can get pretty stiff.)

    Preheat oven to 350°F. On floured board, roll dough into 13" square; cut into 2&1/2 inch squares. Shape rounded teaspoonful of filling in the center of each square. Bring two diagonal corners of each square to the center and pinch. Place on ungreased cookie sheet. Bake at 350°F for 20 minutes (until the edges start going light brown). Cool.​

    We've started covering our cookie sheets with parchment paper for these, although foil could work, too (just not as well). The thing is, the preserves have a tendency to bubble over and will cause quite a mess to pry/melt/scrape off of your cookie sheets, but come off the parchment paper with relative ease.

    The dough doesn't rise and barely expands in the oven, so you can pack them fairly close together on the sheet.

    If you have a cutter/tool that will put fancy ridged edges on the dough, this recipe would be a perfectly suitable time to use it, for that extra touch

    This dough will form flaky little layers without the added tedium/complication of laminating your dough or anything. This is a very light and tender cookie... one which, if not kept refrigerated, will mold like a son of a bitch; maybe eat them before they grow a new civilization. They're probably best at room temperature, so if you're having company or a party or something, don't even bother refrigerating them.

    I shouldn't even have to say this, but don't try to eat them right out of the oven like other cookies. A: They taste better when they've cooled a bit, B: You WILL scald your mouth trying to eat bubbling-hot, sticky, preserves. I know from experience. >_>

    A lot of people make Kifli this way, but considering the word means 'crescent/twist' and these are diamond-shaped...

    *Although all we could find this year was almond filling, I'd point out it is NOT almond paste: I somehow don't think that stuff would yield the intended results.

    Oh, and here are pics of the Hazelnut Crinkles and Ginger Cookies.
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2017
  18. Xiph0

    Xiph0 Administrator Admin

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2005
    Messages:
    8,987
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    People's Republic of California
    It all looks and sounds so good, but so unhealthy.
     
  19. CaptainFlowers

    CaptainFlowers Fourth Year DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2017
    Messages:
    110
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    USA
    This isn't so much a submission, but more of a general question --

    Does anyone here recommend a good store bought eggnog and/or a homemade recipe?

    I'd rather spend my money right instead of spending it wrong, lol.
     
  20. Zombie

    Zombie John Waynes Teeth Prestige DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2007
    Messages:
    2,051
    High Score:
    2,094
    Alton Brown has a good recipe.
     
Loading...
Similar Threads
  1. Zombie
    Replies:
    22
    Views:
    1,278
  2. Zombie
    Replies:
    13
    Views:
    830
  3. Download
    Replies:
    61
    Views:
    2,908
  4. Jon
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    492