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DLP gets Fit(ter) 2018

Discussion in 'Real Life Discussion' started by Jjf88, Jan 13, 2018.

  1. Jjf88

    Jjf88 Auror

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    Hey guys,

    I know Taure created a thread about Fitness in 2016 and it had a bit of interest in it. So I thought I'd make one.

    I'm nowhere near as active as I used to be on DLP about..5 years ago, and even then it was sporadic IRC chat. I plan to use this thread to track my workouts and offer advice about training, and to engage a bit more with people.

    My background and why the fuck I am qualified to give advice:

    Qualified PT (realistically this means jack, PT qualifications are a piss take to get)
    Qualified Strength and Conditioning coach (lil bit more legit, qualified via KBT education, v good company if anyone's interested in their stuff)
    Background of Thai Boxing


    The studies are coming in more and more often that resistance training offers more and more benefits compared to traditional cardiovascular methods. So if your goal is fat loss, consider using more resistance based training than the treadmill. This isn't to say you won't lose weight running or biking, Oz was a great example of cardio working, but for the most part resistance training in the gym tends to work out best.

    Diet: A calorie deficit is key to losing weight. Losing fat requires a decent amount of protein (shoot for 1g per lb of body weight, or take your weight in kg and multiple it by 2-2.5) and 0.5 of your bodyweight in lbs for carbs. This is a general rule of thumb and will depend on the individual but this seems to be a decent starting point.

    If you take your bodyweight in lbs and multiply it by 12, you'll get a rough estimation of your calorie deficit needed to lose weight.

    You can then work out how to spread your calories out by taking your protein intake in grams and multiplying it by 4.

    Then your carbs are also multiplied by 4.

    Add them together and subtract from your calories, divide the number by 9 and you have the amount of fat you need to intake.

    Example:

    180lb individual is 180g of protein per day.
    180x0.5 is 90g per day for carbs.

    180x4 = 720
    90x4 = 360

    720 + 360 = 1090.

    180 x 12 = 2,160, the number of calories needed to lose weight.

    2160 - 1090 = 1070

    1070/9 = 118g. That's your fats.

    So our stats are:

    180g of protein
    90g of carbs
    118g of fats

    2160 calories per day.

    I'll make a post about strength training, which protocols are best to follow in another post as this is getting quite lengthy. Please ask any questions, folks. Want to generate some chat and discussion on the topic.
     
  2. Atlas

    Atlas First Year

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    Nice! I started on my fitness journey 3 months ago, and this thread is perfect to trace my progress a bit.
    I'm currently bulking untill the end of february and then it's time to get schredded.

    My calorie intake at the moment is 2800 on a good day and around 2400 on a bad day.
    I workout 3/4 times a week where I mainly do compound exercises to build strength and I use progressive overload to get stronger.

    I'm worried about my protein intake, on a normal day i get about .5 grams per lb of bodyweight and that should be 1 right?
    And what are your gym routines? Interesting to know
     
  3. Eilyfe

    Eilyfe Headmaster

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    I'm doing keto and bodyweight fitness, and both are showing nice results. For the workout part, I'm keeping to the recommended routine in the bodyweight fitness subreddit. It covers everything nicely, and is a great introduction.

    Since nutrition is where the real fatloss battle is fought however, keto is where it's at in my opinion.

    I'm not too strict, but I try to keep it within the range of 1800 - 2400 kcal/day. Macros are ~130-150g of protein; < 20g net carbs; and about 130-150g fat, depending on what I eat during the day. So my diet is mostly nuts, cheese, meat, green veggies, and eggs.

    It's working out well, and I'm quite happy with the results so far.
     
  4. Jjf88

    Jjf88 Auror

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    Sorry, life got in the way. On with the show.

    There are a few different types of strength but for the sake of convenience, I'll label them thusly:

    Neuromuscular strength - The ability for your muscles to produce force.
    Hypertrophy - Muscle mass. The size of the muscle .

    They go hand in hand. Imagine neuromuscular strength as water. And muscle mass as the cup. The bigger the cup, the more water you can fill it with. Potentially. Due to different genetics, you will get those stronger at certain weights, hence why weight lifters and fighters move up and down weight classes.

    What defines and dictates these two principles?

    Strength - progressive overload. Adding more weight.
    Hypertrophy - more sets (volume)

    This is a very basic outline of them and many factors affect this but that's the bare bones of it.

    Strength protocols are usually in the following ranges (but aren't limited to these): 5x5, 4x6, 3x3, 4x4. Sets of no more than 5, usually, for 3-6 reps.

    Hypertrophy - 3 sets of 8-15 reps. 8-12 will help build strength and general muscle mass where as the higher volume, 12-15 is usually used to exhaust the muscle after the main exercise (squats and lunges, deadlifts and hamstring curls, etc).

    Strength has an added benefit of making the muscle denser and therefore more 'toned'. Although that's only combined with some good dietary work.

    To progress with strength training you would add weight each week. No more than 2.5% of your previous working weight on a given lift for lower body and 1.5% for upper body due to the difference in muscle mass of the areas.

    With hypertrophy it's volume. You should progressively add a set to each muscle group over your training phases. For example, I may start on 3x8 of squats but end up at 5x8 by the end of the 4 weeks. It's per muscle group, not exercise, so be wary you don't overdo it.

    You can run a programme of these phases for 1-3 months but I prefer to run it for 2 months to avoid boredom and because my own gains slow down at that point.

    You should take a deload week at the end of one cycle (one month) where you cut your volume by 40% to stimulate recovery and allow your body to adapt to the accumulated fatigue.
    --- Post automerged ---
    You should aim for 1g/lb or 2g/kg daily. Calories can undulate depending on activity levels, whether it be higher or lower.

    I workout 3 times per week, for 1.5 hours roughly.

    Day 1

    Squat
    Bench
    Dips
    Walking lunges
    Ab movement (weighted planks, ab wheel, loaded carries)

    Day 2

    Deadlift
    Chins
    Bench
    Hamstring, back, conditioning exercise circuit (JordanFlemingFitness, check it out, I uploaded it to there on instagram.)

    Day 3

    Squat
    Overhead Press
    Reverse Lunges
    Slam ball and squat thrusters EMOM (every minute on the minute, 8 reps of each, whatever time i have left of that minute is my rest period).

    I focus on compound movements and accessories for them to keep muscle mass whilst progressing my strength.

    Currently on a strength phase so compounds are usually 5x5 for lower, 4x6 for upper, then 3 sets of 8-12 for accessory movements.

    I need the most bang for buck as I am usually too tired to train after a full day of PT, so I hit it hard, keep my core movements frequent, and eat a shit ton of good food for recovery.
    --- Post automerged ---
    Keto is just another form of calorie deficit. Except it comes from your carbs solely. Don't get caught up in the hype.

    All these diets (paleo, carb cycling, keto, etc.) all have a negative calorie balance at the end of the week.

    Carbohydrates promote recovery and help muscle mass building.

    Competing bodybuilders must make an obligatory caloric reduction. If a reduction in fat is utilized, it may be possible to attenuate a drop in testosterone by maintaining adequate consumption of saturated fat [5]. However, a drop in testosterone does not equate to a reduction in LBM. In direct studies of resistance trained athletes undergoing calorically restricted high protein diets, low fat interventions that maintain carbohydrate levels [13,29] appear to be more effective at preventing LBM loses than lower carbohydrate, higher fat approaches [32,40]. These results might indicate that attempting to maintain resistance training performance with higher carbohydrate intakes is more effective for LBM retention than attempting to maintain testosterone levels with higher fat intakes.


    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4033492/

    If keto works for you, good. But it's not the only route. Keto works well with bodyweight because the carb restriction stops you from developing muscle mass.
     
  5. Giovanni

    Giovanni God of Scotch

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    So far this year I've lost 20 pounds on a combination of keto diet and lots of exercise. Keto because, frankly, it is the easiest way for me to hit my calorie goals. 1500 in, 4000 out every day. Starting weight 225, current 205. Goal 160. Once I hit that I'm going to change things up and try to build a bit of muscle.

    Great thread.
     
  6. Samuel Black

    Samuel Black Minister of Magic

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    I honestly tend to lurk more than anything these days, but I'll make myself available if anyone has any questions about strength training, or more specifically, powerlifting, both as a hobby or competitively.

    I actually really like the keto diet because I think it kind of resets the idea of carbs in people's brains and forces them to cut back on them. I love carbs, don't get me wrong, but I do think that people, and especially overweight people, tend to consume a disproportionate amount of them.
     
  7. Koalas

    Koalas First Year Prestige DLP Supporter

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    Question for the powerlifters. For the past couple years whenever I do a barbell squat, leg press or deadlift I can feel something shifting in my right knee (at about 2oclock looking at it from the top). It's not painful but it is distracting in the 'this should not be shifting' sense. Only advice I could really find online at the time was that it was a tense tendon and proper stretching would get rid of it. It didn't. So I've had to resort to this ridiculously wide stand with my feet at 45* to stop it. Any ideas on what it is/how I can work my form back to something more standard?
     
  8. Samuel Black

    Samuel Black Minister of Magic

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    My first piece of advice would be to go to a doctor, maybe have some imaging done to see if there's an issue, or a physical therapist.

    Second, don't worry about standard. Everybody has different proportions, different levers, etc. As long as you are meeting competition depth (hip crease below knee), then it doesn't really matter what your squat form looks like as far as foot position, foot width, etc. Couple cues that you DO want to follow are: weight over your mid foot, not your toes. Root your feet into the ground, look up "Chris Duffin foot rooting" on YouTube. Knees in line with toes, as in, don't let them collapse.

    For what it's worth, I squat with my feet angled out at 35-45 degrees and I have zero issues from it. It's just what's most comfortable and where I'm strongest at.
     
  9. TheWiseTomato

    TheWiseTomato Tactical Tomato DLP Supporter

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    I have a concrete floor, a barbell, a pair of dumbbells, and no individual weight larger than 10kg. Can't afford a gym membership. Goal is a Tough Mudder three months away.

    What's the best way I can use what I've got?
     
  10. Thaumologist

    Thaumologist Chief Warlock

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    You don't have to worry too much about lifting weights for Tough Mudder (I've done two), about the only time you do have to is the Hero Carry, which is just a ~100m walk, carrying a partner; and Hold Your Wood, which is much longer log carry.

    Most of the other stuff is either bodyweight, or someone else.

    But if you want to complete all the obstacles, then you need to be able to do full pull ups, because the wall climbs are bitches. You'll also want to improve grip strength, because there's monkey bars and the like. Try from a tree in a local park, or ask a neighbour if you don't have any yourself.

    What might get you is the distance. It's about eleven miles, so about 17K. You will be wet, cold, caked in mud, and chafed - I saw four people hauled off due to hypothermia last time, so you should practice running when wet - dump a water bottle over yourself, and go for a run.

    There's actually an 'official' training guide for three months here. Admittedly, it doesn't have a baseline of "just completed C25K", but do your best, and you should get through.

    People on course are generally willing to help if they can, and nobody will laugh or care if you struggle with an obstacle.

    But fuck me, I still have nightmares of Mud Mile.
     
  11. TheWiseTomato

    TheWiseTomato Tactical Tomato DLP Supporter

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    I did one in 2013, and jesus the Mud Mile was nowhere near as bad as that.

    I did get stuck behind a pair of wankers who wouldn't get out of the Arctic Enema though. Ended up pitching myself out the side.
     
  12. Thaumologist

    Thaumologist Chief Warlock

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    One thing I found that helped (along with overall fitness), was weighted runs. I bought a weight vest, and it took ages to get one that met the specs I wanted (alterable weights, small increments, high cap, sold in the UK), but then just wore it around the house. It really helped with stamina.

    So chuck the weights into a backpack or babysling or something, and do the hoovering. It didn't make any real difference to my speed, but I was running for longer.

    And enema is getting worse this year.
     
  13. TheWiseTomato

    TheWiseTomato Tactical Tomato DLP Supporter

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    Aw nah fuck that noise. I ain't going head first into that.
     
  14. Samuel Black

    Samuel Black Minister of Magic

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    How much total weight do you have in plates and in dumbbells?
     
  15. TheWiseTomato

    TheWiseTomato Tactical Tomato DLP Supporter

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    Maybe 40kg in plates? They go on the dumbbell or the barbell. It's one of those little weight sets you get in a case. Not sure what the bars weight, but I don't think they're Olympic standard.
     
  16. Samuel Black

    Samuel Black Minister of Magic

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    If you have a bench or something similar, you can do db press, db flyes, db rows, etc. You can do barbell rows, barbell or db lunges, Bulgarian split squats. You could clean the barbell up and do overhead press. You could do Romanian deadlifts, glute bridges, etc.

    As to how I would do that, I would just work in that 8-12 rep range, do a full body thing 3-4 times a week. Continue to progress the weight until you max out your weight set, and then start adding more sets, or incorporate harder variations of the lifts such as tempo eccentrics, or paused, etc, until you are in a position to either pick up more weight on sale, or find a decent gym membership on the cheap.
     
  17. TheWiseTomato

    TheWiseTomato Tactical Tomato DLP Supporter

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    Nah, no bench. Keeping an eye out for a cheap one second hand, but all anyone is selling is these enormous contraptions with wires and shit. At the moment I'm doing overhead press, db side bends, bent over rows, then squats, db calf raises, and barbell lunges. I looked at deadlifts, but it doesn't seem worth it with the weights I have on hand.
     
  18. Samuel Black

    Samuel Black Minister of Magic

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    I would definitely do Romanian deadlifts. These are a little different from a normal deadlift. Basically start standing up with the weight, and hinge at the hips until you feel a stretch in the hamstrings, then stand back up. The lack of weight shouldn't be an issue in this, and it's super important you get some type of posterior chain movement.

    What you're doing though is good for what you have. The only thing I would add is one arm db rows, super light rear delt flyes, the romanian deadlifts from above.
     
  19. Jjf88

    Jjf88 Auror

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    The best way to assess it would be to post a video. But I agree with Samuel that you should see a doctor.

    Tendons are meant to be elastic and get 'stretched' and strengthened via high volume work loads at 60-70% of your max lift. If your knees are collapsing outwards your tension is weak. But it's an easy fix. Take your stance on your squat at the rack, unrack, find your position then do the following: Dig your big toe, little toe, and heel into the ground. This will create an arch. Your legs will tense slightly and unlock. Keep this tension and squat down. If your knees collapse, you want to cue shoving your knees out to the side to force your adductors to work to keep them balance and tracking over the middle of your foot.

    You could do floor presses with the dumbbells or the barbell but it's the set up for the latter that's tricky without a rack.

    If you absolutely cannot get any more weight or a rack, focus on bodyweight compound movements.

    Press ups. Lie flat on the floor. Roll your shoulders back and down, hands in line with your nipples. Elbow should form an A shape with your torso. Either put weight on your toes or your knees if a full press up is too difficult.

    Take a deep breathe, squeeze your core like you're about to be punched. Now you want to press into the floor, DO NOT LET YOUR HIPS SAG, USE THE CORE. Slow controlled lower to an inch off the ground. Repeat.

    Upper body movements tend to work best with 10-12 reps but you can break them into sets of 3-5. So 2 sets of 5 or 4 sets of 3. It's still accumulating volume.

    Goblet squats. You want your dumbbell in your hands, close to your chest. Shoulders back and down, chest up like you're at attention. Feet just outside the shoulders. Deep breathe again. Initiate the movement by sending your hips back slightly, then drop your backside between your ankles.

    Your knees will drive out and you'll keep your back and chest tight via those shoulders being rolled back and down and the chest up. Drive up, then repeat.

    8-10 repetitions, 3 sets. Add one set per every other week.

    Negative chin ups - Take a grasp of the bar, either in the traditional chin up or the wide grip pull up. You want to jump to the top of the movement, squeeze your muscles so you don't fall down, then slowly lower yourself. The eccentric portion (the lowering porition) is used to develop strength until you perform your full chin up. 8-12 reps as these are very tiring on your CNS. 3 sets. Add one set every other week.
    --- Post automerged ---
    Remember to refeed yourself every few weeks if you are on an extended cut. Your body does adapt and partition nutrients to it's state, esepcially if it is a fasted one.

    A refeed isn't a cheat meal but rather a higher level of carbs over the weekend every 3rd week or so to resensitise your body.

    You could also do a prolong mini bulk where you put your calories 500 above maintenace for 2 weeks to prolong the resensitising (is that a word..?) which would be my advice.

    There's many ways to skin a cat but gains or loss do slow down the further into the phase you are.
    --- Post automerged ---
    Would also add that you should take advantage of the mechanics of the RDL. A slow controlled lower with a fast concentric is a great way to recruit and work the fibres of these particular muscles.
    --- Post automerged ---
    Unsure if they are opened in your area yet, but Decathlon do a few good pieces of kit.

    The DST 100 is basically TRX but a lot cheaper. I used to be the product trainer for Decathlon so I've seen how it's made. It's good quality.

    You could invest in that for £14 (not sure what the price is for yourself) and use a variety of exercises from that.
     
  20. TheWiseTomato

    TheWiseTomato Tactical Tomato DLP Supporter

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    Do I not need a rack for this one?
     
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