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How many people here are religious?

Discussion in 'Real Life Discussion' started by normalguycap, Jul 26, 2016.

  1. Lucia

    Lucia First Year

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    I was born to a Catholic family of the very religious variety, and spent over a decade of my life attending single gender convent schools. It was incredibly stifling, and didn't exactly end up endearing religion to me.

    Back to the original point of this thread, I consider myself an agnostic leaning strongly toward atheism.

    After having experienced what I have of religion, I don't think people should make decisions of such magnitude (as, for example, those concerning religion) without having a strong empirical case for it.
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2016
  2. Eilyfe

    Eilyfe Headmaster

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    Okay, Wildfeather, let’s argue ideas then that are more generally applicable, though those have already been touched upon. Whatever your god is, is he big brother in the Orwellian sense, i.e. does he know everything you think and judge you based on that? If so, there’s your first problem to my mind (or rather any religion's problem).

    Second, the problem with god’s ineffable plan. If that’s part of your faith, whatever that is, then you’re giving the ultimate agent in the universe a blank check for committing atrocities while doing the same for the people who actually carry them out, since they can always say, “Oh, this must be in god’s plan because otherwise he’d stop me. Carry on, then. Line ‘em up.” The idea that rape, genocide, or anything like this is a necessary stepping stone to reach god’s final goal is despicable. Religions problem with god's plan really is that it can't cherry pick. Either you accept all of it, all atrocities included, or none of it. And if you accept all of it, then god's plan is full of malevolent spirit and she's literally wading on a sea of corpses to reach her goal.

    Two points that apply to all religions which subscribe to an absolute authority (omnipotent, omnipresent) with an unknowable plan.
     
  3. chaosattractor

    chaosattractor Groundskeeper

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    Your mindset's been coloured by too much from the Levant.
     
  4. Hashasheen

    Hashasheen Totally Sirius

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    Born a Maronite Catholic, converted to nondenominational Islam (leaning Sunni) at age 13 and still practicing currently. Most I've lapsed was in the usage of alcohol and drugs though very infrequently with both and largely as a crutch to therapy sessions and in response to various stress stimuli.
     
  5. James

    James Professor

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    I'm a non-practicing Buddhist.

    It's awesome.
     
  6. Eilyfe

    Eilyfe Headmaster

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    I'm not quite sure what you mean by that. Are you referring to the refugees that have been coming to Europe from that region or am I missing something? In the former case, I'm not sure how that plays into it. I've held those views for a while now, and my beef has always been with religion in general, not Islam specifically. Admittedly, the extremist strains recently offer a lot of reason to find religion as a whole even more repugnant, but I'd like to think I would have argued similarly even before.
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2016
  7. Lucia

    Lucia First Year

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    The three major religions that have originated from the Levant are Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. These religions all "subscribe to an absolute authority (omnipotent, omnipresent) with an unknowable plan". That's what was meant.
     
  8. Joe's Nemesis

    Joe's Nemesis High Score: 2,058 Prestige

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    If I may interpret, and I think I'm reading it right, but please correct me, chaosattractor, if I'm not, is that your arguments are too tied up in the concepts of God dealing with authority and sovereignty, rather than understanding various god concepts. Or, in simpler terms, you're basing too much of your argument on the Western concepts of God, rather than the vast concepts dealing with a multiplicity of gods in which people all over the world believe.

    At least, that's how I take the statement.

    ---------- Post automerged at 07:14 PM ---------- Previous post was at 07:10 PM ----------

    I find it interesting how people always leave out the fourth—Baha'i. Granted, it only has few adherents in contrast with the other three, but I still find it interesting.
     
  9. Darth_Revan

    Darth_Revan Secret Squirrel Prestige DLP Supporter

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    Islam did not originate in the Levant, just as a point of geography.

    They also aren't the only ones to claim omnipresence and omnipotence, although the 'unknowable plan' part, perhaps.
     
  10. Chengar Qordath

    Chengar Qordath The Final Pony Prestige

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    Yeah, I think it boils down to the fact that Baha'i doesn't have much in the way of adherents, especially in the Western part of the world. It's almost certainly not people consciously excluding Baha'i—they're just not all that aware of it.
     
  11. Eilyfe

    Eilyfe Headmaster

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    Okay, thanks for clearing that up. Can't refute that entirely, though I talked briefly about a part of Buddhism that I find to be ugly earlier in the thread. But yes, in general I'm concentrating on the large monotheistic religions, since they're what is of immediate concern to me.

    @Scrubb: I freely admit to trotting out the sovereignty line of argument whenever I find it appropriate, because to me it's quite a big deal and I take umbrage with religion that subscribes to it (or rather I can't see anything good coming from it).
     
  12. Zatik

    Zatik Squib

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    I am an ateist. I think my mother believes in a catholic god, and my father pretends, that there is something to it. Anyway, my grandfather is a greeks catholic priest tough.
     
  13. Sorrows

    Sorrows Unspeakable Prestige DLP Gold Supporter

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    You have to go back to my great-grandparents to find any religious people in my family, suffice to say I didn't get all that much exposure to religion in my youth (other than a CoE primary school.) Since I have yet to come across a sufficiently convincing argument for the existence of god(s) or for the merits of religion or spirituality, I guess you can call me an atheist of the live and let live breed.
     
  14. Quiddity

    Quiddity Unspeakable

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    I thought this sounded like bullshit.

    In fairness, the denial of communion is pretty massive, and possibly the worst aspect of excommunication. But excommunication itself is extremely rare.
     
  15. Harshmate

    Harshmate First Year

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    I'm an atheist. But I'm also kind of a Hindu in the sense that I love the festivals and the foods. Hinduism has many major schools of thought that reject any sort of God. You can also reject any of the "holy books" and still be a Hindu. So that's basically what I do.
     
  16. lolerdsa

    lolerdsa Squib

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    I believe in some high power, but I'm not sure one would call that being religious.
     
  17. AndreasE

    AndreasE Squib

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    Although I'm technically Muslim I'd say I'm more agnostic in the sense of I want to believe in something but can't quite do it. Also, most of my family wouldn't consider me Muslim to be honest, despite bein raised that way. It's more that I try to take the good parts of the religion and apply them to my life, and don't follow the parts I dislike. Kinda convoluted I guess
     
  18. Roger

    Roger Squib

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    I'm an atheist and was raised that way. I don't think I'll ever believe in a higher power. Some of my friends are religious though.
     
  19. Lady_Dirsa

    Lady_Dirsa Squib

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    I would consider myself atheist. I was raised as Christian and attended Sunday school and confirmation, but never considered myself especially religious. My family still is religious, so that is a source of some tension.
     
  20. pantherasapiens

    pantherasapiens Squib

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    I would consider myself fairly religious - raised Christian, still practising, though obviously far from perfectly.

    (I'm actually juuuuust a little nervous about saying that, because - ah - farther up the page it looks like being anything close to comparatively devout is something of an unpopular thing to be.)
     
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