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RL Questions that don't deserve their own thread

Discussion in 'Real Life Discussion' started by CheddarTrek, May 31, 2013.

  1. Perspicacity

    Perspicacity High Score: 3,994 Prestige DLP Supporter

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    My sister-in-law is a practicing neurosurgeon in the U.S. specializing in stroke. She also has a Ph.D. in public health with an emphasis on policy related to stroke treatment. If you're serious with your question, send me a PM and I can see about putting you in contact with her.
     
  2. Genghiz Khan

    Genghiz Khan Auror

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    I don't have any first-hand knowledge, but a close childhood friend's father is a neurosurgeon. In a nutshell, it's very tiring work. I'd often be in the house when he'd come back home and fall into a sofa, bonelessly exhausted. He'd have operations going on for 12 hours+ in which he'd be standing in one place, moving nothing but his hands. You need to have absolute concentration. One mistake and someone could be a vegetable.

    It takes a long time to be trained as a neurosurgeon, and I think you'd be considered ready at around the age of 36 or so in most cases to be independent and practicing. I'd recommend really thinking long and hard about taking this career path. Take your pre-med courses, talk to as many neurosurgeons as you can (and definitely take Pers's offer if you're serious about this career path) and think really really hard before you take this course of action. It's one of the hardest fields to be a surgeon in because the margin of error in operating on the brain is considered smaller than most other surgeries. As the neurosurgeon I know once jokingly said, leave a towel in someone's tummy and be served a lawsuit. Leave a towel in someone's brain and voila! A vegetable.
     
  3. Garden

    Garden Minister of Magic

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    In th US:

    1. College - 4 years

    2. Medical school-4 years

    Optional: year or two of research to strengthen your application for a competitive residency, which is I increasingly common.

    3. Residency-7 years, usually. Hours are brutal: 60-90 hour weeks (legally you can't exceed 80, IIEC, but unofficially, many (not all) programs exceed 80/week, tons to learn.

    4. Many do a fellowship of 1-2 years in something after residency-- skull based surgery, interventional radiology type stuff, neurooncology, etc.

    So if you're in the US you're looking at 33-35 as the age of being an independent neurosurgeon, more if you specialize more or take a break or research more, etc.

    The neurosurgeons I've met have all been pretty smart but not all are brilliant. They're incredibly hard working, disciplined, workaholics...but not geniuses. So if you're okay with a hilariously high workload at one of the most cutting edge medical fields, look more into it. Otherwise...probably not worth it.
     
  4. KHAAAAAAAN!!

    KHAAAAAAAN!! Troll in the Dungeon Prestige DLP Supporter

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    My buddy from high school aka the valedictorian diverted out of the Hopkins neurosurgery program into urology. The pressure of the practice ORs got to him apparently. In cardiac and neuro, not only do you need to be able to rotely memorize vast sums of information, as is the med school standard, but you also need to be able to recall, analyze. And apply that info on the fly, otherwise you have a dead patient.

    My advise is this, as you are only sixteen: before you even think about a future med school discipline, you need to take the "make you or break you" 300/400 level college med prep classes like advanced A+P, biochem, and mol bio and see if all the rote memorization agrees with you.

    If you're still set on med school after that, by all means go for it. After you get through the first year, which is known as the year of dropouts, THEN decide which field you want to go into, and study like hell to pass the required boards.
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2017
  5. Darth_Revan

    Darth_Revan Secret Squirrel Prestige DLP Supporter

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    Don't worry, though. If Uncle Ben Carson taught us anything, it's that you can be dumb as a brick and still be a neurosurgeon.
     
  6. why?

    why? First Year

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    Some of my friends in med school who are considering going into surgery have talked a lot about Atul Gawande's book. I've only skimmed through a few, but they appear to provide a clear view into what it actually is like to be a surgeon.

    Also, if you're in high school, I would suggest spending more time trying things, and less planning on things you don't have direct experience with. As Khan suggested, try a premed course or two, perhaps at your local community college, and then take things from here. Who knows, maybe somewhere along the way, you'll find that you like other aspects of medicine better, or maybe something else entirely.

    Best of luck!
     
  7. The Pro

    The Pro Seventh Year

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    Alright, thanks for all the advice guys.
     
  8. Anarchy

    Anarchy Prisoner DLP Supporter

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    I don't know shit about dogs, but my friend recently got a new puppy, and he uses some sort of spray to stop it from using people as a chew toy. It works really well. Spray it on someones hands, and it will (mostly) stop biting the hands. Not sure what it's called though.
     
  9. Marsupial

    Marsupial Death Eater DLP Supporter

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    There are a million varieties of that stuff out there. Usually seems to be bitrex or another bitter agent mixed with random stuff so it smells nice to humans.
     
  10. Palindrome

    Palindrome Magma Moderator Moderator DLP Supporter

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    I relayed your question to my mum, because if there's one person who knows about plants it's her! She says:

     
  11. CheddarTrek

    CheddarTrek Set Phasers to Melt Moderator DLP Supporter

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    Anyone from Hawaii or spent extensive time traveling there?

    I'm going soon for two weeks and right now my plans are essentially the following:

    6 days - Maui. I'm attending a wedding here and I'll have friends. A nice hotel is booked, another friend has a car (though I might rent one myself if I want to do something and no one else does), etc.

    3 days - 'Big Island.' I'm most excited about this as it appears to have the best hiking. I am hoping to rent a car here and then buy/rent a cheap tent and camp in the National Park. Feasible? I don't want to book this before I get to Hawaii at all, as plans might change when I meet up with friends in Maui.

    3 days - Honolulu and surrounding area. I fly into Maui but I set it up so that I fly out of Honolulu. I hear that the public transportation is good on Oahu so I shouldn't need to rent a car here. Planning to stay in hostels if they are safe (I don't care if they're shit).

    I'm there for 14 days total so that does leave me a little extra time for travel and whatnot if needed.

    I've got enough funds that I won't be running out of money, but one thing I hate is having to spend it on things like a rental car (that I'll spend very little time driving, but need b/c of a lack of other options) or a hotel (which I won't do anything but sleep in). I hear bed'n'breakfasts are good in Hawaii too, but haven't looked into that in detail.

    Any "must do" activities? I can't scuba dive due to my eyes, but pretty much anything else. Water sports are fun too. I guess I should take some sort of out-of-shape-idiots-guide-to-surfing class just to say I did.

    Apparently it's fairly easy to book last-minute flights between islands, but you need to get camping permits in advance? This amuses me.
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2017
  12. Seyllian

    Seyllian Groundskeeper DLP Supporter

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    I've been to Honolulu multiple times. If you go there you have to visit Pearl Harbor. Not really something super exciting, but as an American, you kinda just have to go there.
     
  13. Johnnyseattle

    Johnnyseattle Auror DLP Supporter

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    I spent three years living on Oahu while in the Navy. There are a few things I would say about your time there.

    1. You're already doing the best thing on the big Island, and I suggest doing it on Maui too - hiking. It's amazing there - some parts of the central areas of all three islands you're going to are like alien ecosystems compared to what you'll see in most of the USA. Take more water than you think you'll need though, it's fucking brutal hot in the jungle parts sometimes. Pipiwai trail is a nice jaunt, but it's a man-made trail, which turns some people off a bit I guess. Still great stuff though.

    2. Eat all the fish (especially in poke form). I don't really eat anything but fish and saimin (basically Hawaiian ramen) if I end up there, and I never get tired of it.

    3. If you decide to attend a luau, don't go to one of the huge touristy ones, unless you're looking for the cheesy, over-the-top presentation. The Polynesian cultural center on Oahu has the coolest one IMHO, and you get the awesome history lessons on top of it. Well worth the drive over to that part of the island.

    4. Water sports. So. You may have heard it can be a bit... hostile on beaches there if you're not a local. Most times when you hear things like this, it sounds like over-dramatic paranoia, but in this case, they're not kidding - I wouldn't do any activity having to do with surfing or anything like it outside of the main touristy beaches, the locals are complete jackasses about outsiders. Localism in its worst and highest form.

    5. There is a really awesome resort on the SW corner of Oahu called Ko'Olina that is way too expensive to stay or golf in, but the beaches are open to the public. And they created man-made lagoons in a few places that you can swim in and stuff with no waves. It's one of the perfect places to get some quiet sun and have a lazy cocktail. They've opened the Disney resort right close by since I left though, so this might be outdated a bit I guess.

    6. Maui has an aquarium (Maui Ocean Center) that is pretty cool, and Haleakala national park (the volcano) is awesome. Other than that, Maui is kind of where people go to be lazy and snorkel/dive a lot, which it's terrible that you can't do. I was there much more than I was on the big island, so I can't say much about the big one.

    I'll edit in anything else big I think of, or let me know if you have any more specific questions.
     
  14. Seyllian

    Seyllian Groundskeeper DLP Supporter

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    I found Ko'olina beaches to be rather boring. :(
     
  15. Johnnyseattle

    Johnnyseattle Auror DLP Supporter

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    Well, like I said, it's all in what you want to do. Boring is good if you want to have a drink, read a book, and get some sun without hundreds of pasty tourists or angry, shitty locals around you.
     
  16. KHAAAAAAAN!!

    KHAAAAAAAN!! Troll in the Dungeon Prestige DLP Supporter

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    Whu can't you scuba? There are prescription scuba masks. I actually bought mine in Hawaii.

    Also, big Island is definitely king if you're not super interested in beaching. Mauna Kea sunset/sunrise tour is kewl, and the star show from the gathering point is pretty spectacular. Spending a full day hiking in volcano park is easily done. Circumnavigating the island and sightseeing the coast and volcano sand beaches might be a fun thing to do. The views are fucking amazeballs.
     
  17. CheddarTrek

    CheddarTrek Set Phasers to Melt Moderator DLP Supporter

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    I can't scuba because of the pressure. TMI to follow!

    I have some interesting eye problems that stem mostly from being born with a cataract - a semi-experimental surgery when I was only eight weeks old to correct it, etc. Worked but led me to developing glaucoma as a young child too.

    Anyway. I went to Space Academy when I was around 16 and they had a kiddie-sized astronaut training tanks. I filled out a medical safety thing and something got flagged, my eye doctor was called, and it was determined that diving down to 40 feet was not a thing I should risk due to the pressure possibly weakening one of the eye surgeries and causing the eye to partially implode.

    THAT said. He wasn't sure, and I never followed up on it as an adult because the idea of having to equalize my ears regularly terrifies me. Apparently the tubes or w/e in your ears that need to open to equalize are especially small in my ears and more than once I've spent the first several days of a vacation in a lot of pain because I couldn't get them to equalize properly. Once after flying home I had regular severe pain for three weeks.

    Now if I'm getting on a plane I buy two sets of EarPlanes, take Pseudoephedrine (a suggestion from a doctor to try out the ear and try to make it easier to pop), and stay awake 100% of the time because god forbid I doze off and wake up to my ears needing attention.

    Er hem. Anyway, the ear thing is painful but not dangerous. The eye thing is potentially serious, but unconfirmed to be a problem.
    I could snorkel, I'm sure. I could probably even scuba down 20 feet or so without worrying about my eyes, but that would also require a prescription scuba mask (and my prescription is not likely to be 'in-stock') and a lot of ear pain.

    I've always wanted to scuba dive though. QQ

    ANYWAY!

    Great comments mate! I made a note of everything you mentioned, and I'm glad the hiking is phenomenal. And your tips on which luau to attend and which hiking trails to try is great.

    I googled this and it looks fucking delicious. Especially if I can find one with salmon. But om nom fucking nom.

    Good to know it's not just rumor but is real. I expect I'll be fine only doing water sports on the major touristy beaches - water sports have never been a huge thing for me. It's fun to swim, and I want to try surfing just to say I did, but in general I don't feel a need to jump into the water every time I see it.

    The Ko'Olina beaches sound nice for walking and looking and having a drink. I mean, half the appeal of Hawaii beaches for me is walking on them in the surf and seeing the amazing views. It's casual exercise. And if you can add a drink to that? Perfect. I'm not interested in 'exciting' beaches with parties, if that's why these ones are boring. Hah.

    Any tips on getting around the island or where I should stay? Spoiler tags below so that this post doesn't look so damn long.

    I'm mostly set on Maui I think. Some friends and I are splitting a nice hotel room for the wedding, and I have two separate groups of friends renting cars. I could also rent a car if needed - I know a lot of places it's best to not rent at the airport because prices are higher, but not sure if there's a rental place not associated with it.

    The Big Island it looks like I'll have to rent a car. Which is probably going to be more than a hotel room, looks like $250-300 a day? Geez. It's apparently illegal to sleep in your car in Hawaii, which is a pain in the ass and also the reason why I started to look into camping.

    I think I'll go to the National Park where camping seems to be first come first served (everywhere else you need a permit in advance?) and if I don't get a site then maybe just look for a Bed-n-Breakfast type thing. Air BnB appears to have some neat options for less than a hotel room.

    I hear that I can avoid renting a car on Oahu - would you agree with that? I would much rather use public transport if possible, but I don't want to get cut out of anything awesome because of it.

    Debated looking into hostels here, again to save cash, but I've heard that they are 'dangerous.' As someone who stayed extensively in hostels all over Europe and was told the same thing, but never once felt in danger, I'm hesitant to believe it's worse here. But maybe it is.

    Oh, and travel between islands. Apparently there's a few small Hawaiian only airlines that jump between the islands. I figure I'll buy those tickets a day or three in advance once I have my schedule set up better (which will be around the time the wedding guests are leaving).

    Which brings me to the question... what's the internet like? I assume they have wifi at most major hotels and some restaurants just like the rest of the US, but this feels like a thing I should double check if I'm going to be booking flights and rooms once I'm already there.
    Thanks everyone! Great tips all around. I can't wait.
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2017
  18. KHAAAAAAAN!!

    KHAAAAAAAN!! Troll in the Dungeon Prestige DLP Supporter

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    Wifi will not be a problem on any of the three main islands. Every hotel and condo complex is going to have it, and there are multiple sit down coffee shops in every town peddling kona blends and free internet.
     
  19. Johnnyseattle

    Johnnyseattle Auror DLP Supporter

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    It sounds strange, but one of the most popular places to get it for the locals I used to golf with was Safeway. Their fish section had the best octopus version I ever had on Oahu at least. It sounds strange to say, but if you look up the listings for any Diners, Drive-ins & Dives show set in Hawaii, there are a few really good places he went to on the islands that you could get to no problem.

    I should mention here, I'm not sure the availability of drinks there *at* the beach, you may have to bring them yourself.

    I'd look on Kayak for rates, it's always cheap if you go through them. 30ish a day for small cars at Kona airport, by the look of it.

    The lodging has never been an issue for me, truthfully - there's a hotel there that serves nothing but military/DoD/Govt that is absolutely amazing, and cheap as all get-out. So I've never dealt with hostels at all. Any other I've stayed in while in America (except Seattle, strangely enough) have been pretty dodgy though - way more so than any in Europe I saw. I honestly didn't know there were any in Hawaii. :) Hotel prices are all going to be shit this time of year too, which is unfortunate.

    The AirBnB thing is probably a good bet though, with how many people just have vacation places there - I know most touristy places hate AirBnB, because they lose a lot of hotel customers to them. Which is good for us, as consumers.

    This is largely dependent on where you want to stay, really. So, for instance - if you're in Honolulu, down by the beach, and you want to go over to Ko'Olina - that's a good hour drive with traffic, and probably a 3-bus trip or a really expensive cab (I'm not sure how Uber/Lyft service is there, I haven't been on-island since 2011). Plus, the Cultural Center is a good 45m north too. It's bigger than it looks there. I'd rent a small car.

    Looks like it's a bit more expensive these days than when I was living there - about 89ish bucks for a hop. Used to get to Maui for $49. :(

    Bad luck with the diving thing. Can you snorkel though? Because if so, and if it's open (it closes from time to time to give the ecosystem a rest), you should really go to Hanauma Bay on Oahu while you're there - it's amazing to see the coral beds and ocean life, and you're just floating - no ear pressure needed.

    Anymore banter you want about this, PM me and we can find a suitable chat avenue so I'm not posting eternal walls of crap here. :)
     
  20. Seyllian

    Seyllian Groundskeeper DLP Supporter

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    If I recall correctly Ko'Olina does have bars along their beach. Like 100-200 feet inwards and I don't think you need a Marriott Key to get in there. It has been a while since I've been there though, but I think I can recall a bar where I was watching March Madness games along the beach when I was there. There is also a Disney hotel next to Marriott resort and they are sure to have drinks there as well.