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Swimming

Discussion in 'Real Life Discussion' started by Oz, Nov 8, 2019 at 12:04 AM.

  1. Oz

    Oz For Zombie. Moderator DLP Supporter

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    Swimming, swimming, swimming.

    Joined a pool last week because I'd like to do a triathlon next year and I'm going 3 times a week now. And it's fucking hard.

    Started with 5 lengths (250m) which took me 31 minutes. Then 7 lengths (350m) which took about 30 minutes. And then 8 lengths (400m) which took me about 29 minutes. It's definitely getting easier to take less time to recover between lengths but I'm struggling.

    Any advice on what to focus on for a beginner? I've been looking stuff up online but I'm not sure what's useful and what's BS. For now I've just been trying to focus on breathing evenly.
     
  2. Microwave

    Microwave Groundskeeper

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    highelbowshighelbowshighelbowshighelbowshighelbowshighelbowshighelbowshighelbowshighelbowshighelbowshighelbowshighelbowshighelbowshighelbowshighelbowshighelbowshighelbowshighelbowshighelbowshighelbowshighelbowshighelbowshighelbowshighelbows

    It'll make your swimming experience so much more efficient.

    Your forearm has a much bigger area than your hand, so most of your pull will come from it. If your elbows are flat, you're pretty much wasting away half of what you can do.

    (I haven't watched this video but it looks okay)


    Breathing evenly really depends on where your strengths are, if you're able to keep your body balanced and symmetrical without doing it, that's great, and breathing evenly doesn't really matter. If you can't, breathing evenly can help a lot with it.
     
  3. Oz

    Oz For Zombie. Moderator DLP Supporter

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    That seems really helpful, I don't have nearly that much flexibility in the shoulders, but something I can work on.
     
  4. Selethe

    Selethe normalphobe

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    Form is very important.
    - Keep your chin tucked, eyes on the stripe at the bottom of the lane. Never, ever lift your head-- turn your body sideways to breath.
    - Wear a swim cap even if you have short hair (reduces drag)
    - Learn to flip-turn at the end of a lap. This helps keep momentum.
    - Spend as much time underwater as you can. If you watch Olympic swimmers, they cover over half the length of the pool just from the force of diving/flip-turning and dolphin kicking beneath the water. You're actually slower above water.
    - Stretch your arm forward as far as you can and pull to swim.
    - Don't let your legs drop. Keeping your head tucked down helps with this, as it pushes your body into a horizontal form. You want to be laying on top of the water, even if you get tired. Bad form wastes so much energy.

    There's a lot more but it's kinda hard to give advice without actually seeing what you're doing. I would also suggest practicing other strokes like Butterfly and Backstroke, along with Freestyle. Butterfly to help with core strength and dolphin kicking, and Backstroke so you get used to rolling your body side to side to swim, along with not being able to look everywhere.
     
  5. Microwave

    Microwave Groundskeeper

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    The fastest part of your swimming, unless you're diving, is when you push off the wall, so you'd want to take advantage of that momentum as much as you can before you start slowing down.

    But you're not going to really get anywhere with it if you're subpar with your butterfly kicking. The point is to keep the speed you have when you push off the wall as long as you can, and you'll fall off immediately if you're not able to propel yourself properly.

    Here's another video that was the first search result:


    I'd suggest investing in some fins to practice that. You need a bit of mid-body strength to do butterfly kicks, since they're propelled from your lower back. Fins are helpful in that they force you to use more of your strength when you're swimming whilst at the same time allowing you to go a bit faster.

    On a similar regard, paddles are also helpful to get you into form. They're quite cumbersome, so you won't really be able to move without getting your form in check (high elbows, keeping your body on the same axis, etc.) They're hard to use, even for experienced swimmers, but they're immensely helpful.

    Yeah, no matter how tired you are, you have to remember that you're actually getting more tired trudging through the water with bad form than if you're deliberately adjusting how your moving.
     
  6. Jon

    Jon The Demon Mayor Admin DLP Supporter

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    I know it costs money, but find a Physio nearby and tell them you want to improve your shoulder ROM (range of motion.) Or youtube some appropriate videos on stretches you can do to increase your range.

    Physios can do manual therapy as well which is very effective at getting you kicked off in improvement. If you do end up going that route check reviews for the physio before picking one.