1. Hi there, Guest

    Only registered users can really experience what DLP has to offer. Many forums are only accessible if you have an account. Why don't you register?
    Dismiss Notice
  2. DLP Writing Competition
    Topic is EITHER Hogwarts Ghosts OR Duelling!
    Click here for more Guest!
    Due Date is June 20th!
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Introducing for your Perusing Pleasure

    New Thread Thursday
    +
    Shit Post Sunday

    READ ME
    Dismiss Notice

How to Design a LitRPG System

Discussion in 'Original Fiction Discussion' started by BTT, Sep 20, 2020.

  1. Ched

    Ched Da Trek Moderator DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2009
    Messages:
    7,853
    Location:
    The South
    Right right - I get it. But even in that case still no traditional publishers.

    I’m not arguing that these stories aren’t legit and aren’t doing super well - they are. I can’t wait to read Red Mage as a good example of the genre.

    But it sounds like NO ONE is going traditional publishing with the genre and I find that fascinating. Interesting. And very curious.

    Also loved the ‘hoovering’ description for the top shelf audio book makers, lol.

    Off to read the first five chapters of Red Mage (still up on Royal road!)
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2020
  2. sildet

    sildet Sixth Year

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2015
    Messages:
    170
    Didn't love Red Mage. It's alright, but really a meh story.

    I remember liking Tao Wong's Life in the North series, but it gets bogged down in the later books (It's pretty generic, but I liked it more than Red Mage). His other novel, A Thousand Li is a xianxia novel that's pretty decent.

    Towers of Heaven by Cameron Milan is a pretty good one.

    Reborn: Apocalypse by L M Kerr I remember liking quite a bit. The audiobook narrator was annoying with some of the voices though, but mostly okay.

    The Land series by Aleron Kong is one that people like, but I kind of hate.

    Cradle by Will Wight isn't LitRPG, but hits the same progression fantasy vibes from the genre.


    Most of what I've read for this genre is like an action movie that you can have on in the background while you do other things. It's not incredible, but it's entertaining. Like if you're listening to the audiobook, and you miss some stuff because you're doing something else, it's not hard to get sucked back in and not miss much.
     
  3. Gengar

    Gengar Polymagus ~ Prestige ~ DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2009
    Messages:
    1,867
    High Score:
    6005
    I hated Life in the North. I remember the MC feeling like he was written by a teenage angst monster. I got like to the second book, and from memory he was just constantly raging and showing no character growth. I peaced out there.
     
  4. Otters

    Otters Seventh Year ~ Prestige ~ DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2010
    Messages:
    203
    High Score:
    2005
  5. sildet

    sildet Sixth Year

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2015
    Messages:
    170
    Feels odd to me that someone could like one and hate the other as I found that they're both pretty similar lol, but to each their own. I think I just liked the level up system more in Life of the North. I didn't like the spell interweaving in Red Mage as much. It got confusing to me.

    None of the published ones are amazing, which is why I hope Cxjenious was being truthful on the last page haha.
     
  6. Gengar

    Gengar Polymagus ~ Prestige ~ DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2009
    Messages:
    1,867
    High Score:
    6005
    Whether I like a story or not hinges entirely on the protagonist. Like, ninety percent of it is that.

    I read books, especially litRPGs, for escapism. The second I stop vibing with the protagonist, I'm out. It's almost like I start to de-sync with the character in the book and everything starts falling apart. I start to cringe and turn on the character to the point where I just have to drop the book, that's what happened with me in LitN.

    The mechanics of the litRPG mean very little to me as long as they're sensible and written by a person who's actually played a video game before.

    I didn't really go into this though because the OP specifically mentioned designing a litRPG system.

    Protagonist > Dialogue > World > Supporting Cast > Story > Mechanics, in that order, for me.
     
  7. Reign

    Reign Fourth Year

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2008
    Messages:
    124
    Gender:
    Male
    levelup.pub has a page explaining LitRPG/GameLit, how to write a litRPG and an example story. There is also an 'all time best' for each category but that's ridiculously subjective especially for this genre.

    Also, I noticed there isn't a LitRPG recommendation thread. Am I the only one hesitating in its creation because its going to be full of crap?
     
  8. Ched

    Ched Da Trek Moderator DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2009
    Messages:
    7,853
    Location:
    The South
    There’s a bunch of specific Rec threads in the original fiction section.
    https://forums.darklordpotter.net/forums/original-fiction.143/
     
  9. Ched

    Ched Da Trek Moderator DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2009
    Messages:
    7,853
    Location:
    The South
    To get us back on topic...

    How to design a LitRPG system.

    I haven't read as many of these as @Gengar but I might still be able to offer insight.

    My favorite so far is Seaborn because I think it's the best story of the ones I've read. But a few things it does right in terms of the system so help.

    I like the idea of skills combining. Here's a quote:
    Practicing skills feels useful but not OP. New skills can be created as you do things but it's not constant. Typically the system supports the story but the story does not rely on it. Otherwise I feel this story is straightforward with it. There are quests. The system is built into the world and fully integrated for everyone.

    Life of a Skill Trainer focuses on the system itself in a way that I haven't seen others do. In my opinion the exploration of the system itself is carrying the story (though apparently some people are invested in the romance subplot). The main character has so devoted his life to learning all sorts of skills and how to teach them to others, and in the story he discovers some skills that others want kept secret. For all that I find this story interesting I can't say it did this part right, since (for me) I'm only reading out of curiosity about their system. But it's still important to have the system itself be interesting, otherwise it's clutter.

    I think Red Mage got that part right, though I didn't like the story much (sorry Gengar, bit much of a male fantasy power wank for me). If it had been free though instead of 5$ I'd recommend it.

    Anyway - in Red Mage the author created a somewhat unique system. It's a little like materia in a way, though instead of slotting Mana gems into your weapons or armor you slot them into your own personal grid. Find a 'fireball' gem? Slot it and now you can cast it!

    This was neat. And gems could be inserted such that they linked up to combine into new skills, etc.

    Another thing that Red Mage did that I thought worked fairly well was give spells a cooldown but that's the only barrier to casting. There's no Mana pool to run low on, etc. You can cast cast cast if you chain cooldowns.

    One thing in terms of the litRPG genre that I think that story struggled with was with the level of difficulty. Dude gets lots of useful spells really quickly, can cast all of them perfectly without training/practice, and continually seems to upgrade his use of them (using many at once, one from each finger, etc) without issue on the first try in combat.

    It was too easy for me to feel invested. The challenges (mental, emotional, combat or otherwise) all felt tacked on rather than real. It's like the author said COOL STUFF and just skipped past any challenges with learning it.

    I've read others but those three stood out to me of the ones I've read so far in terms of having something to discuss on HOW to do this well.
     
  10. Gengar

    Gengar Polymagus ~ Prestige ~ DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2009
    Messages:
    1,867
    High Score:
    6005
    I think you can tie a lot of it back into these authors wanting to get over the 'boring' bits, not realizing their destination becomes all the more unfulfilling if you skip the journey.

    Like I said earlier, I am very much a proponent of Less is More. Someone should write a story where the main character has Frostbolt (insert any other standard spell/skill you so choose), and that's it. Work around how such a 'character' would be able to survive and win. Get creative, have fun with it.

    Too many authors rush for the endorphin highs of LOOT and SKILL GAINS that they forget to full explore and enjoy the ones they already have. I mentioned it earlier, it's what triggers me about 'blink strike' in so many of these stories - you don't NEED more than that one ability to make a fascinating story, and instead they add on ten more because it's 'cool.'

    Ultimately that's what I find the biggest problem in this genre. Too many of these authors feel like they've come straight from their DnD campaigns, or watching anime, and just write what they think sounds cool in their heads without thinking it through - some sounds like they've even come straight from being ganked in WoW hilariously, given how they react to PKers (who calls it that?!).

    As I said, none of these are masterworks. Not even close. I'm still addicted to them though.

    The bard one is more to my tastes. A local, contained mystery, a limited set of bardic skills and an interesting 'profession' in Lorekeeper (or something to that effect) where the main character is compelled to explore the mysteries of the hamlet around him by both experience gains and just simple curiosity.

    The second one was a bit shit, unfortunately.

    It often feels like you're scraping the bottom of the barrel when it comes to LitRPG (often might be an understatement). It has been getting a lot more popular though. I'm biding my time until the good shit comes.

    Maybe I'll even pull my finger out one day and give it a go myself... @Jon and I certainly talk about it enough...
     
  11. Ched

    Ched Da Trek Moderator DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2009
    Messages:
    7,853
    Location:
    The South
    More on what works / doesn't work in various litRPGs (which I think is more related to this thread than others).

    I can't say that I've been loving Randidly Ghosthound, but I am enjoying it. It does some things right and some wrong, but two things it does that I liked are as follows:

    1. The area that the MC is in dictates (to a large extent) where he's the "super badass most powerful person around" stereotype or the "talented upcoming youth" stereotype. It does this by alternating the 'world' that the MC is in - on Earth he's a big badass, but on the other world he is talented and powerful but (at least at first) mostly a skilled youth that the real badasses of the world would eat for lunch.

    This worked because I still got that rush of "aw yeah we're badass" but every other arc we'd be back at "gotta work hard to grow / no pain no gain / my life is on the line."

    I think this might even out soon (I'm not caught up on the story), but this is one thing it did well in my opinion.

    2. The idea of "paths" was neat, though the rest of the leveling / points system I wasn't a big fan of. But 'Paths' in this story made it feel like the MC had real, valid choices on which direction to take his skills and implied that you can't do everything. Not really. It made choices with regards to the system feel somewhat meaningful.

    There were issues as well - with the MC getting hundreds of points at a time so none of them felt like they meant much - but that's a separate issue. This thread is more about the "right" things to do when designing a litRPG, and the rest can go for a review thread.

    Cheers.
     
  12. Ched

    Ched Da Trek Moderator DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2009
    Messages:
    7,853
    Location:
    The South
    I've been debating revising one of my current original fics as a LitRPG (also YA).

    I wouldn't mind some feedback on it as I'm debating how exactly to handle one aspect of it.

    == == == ==

    There are no levels, only 9 stats divided into 3 categories and 6 skills. Unlimited perks (which are consolation prizes for skills you continue to decline).

    A person trains / does quests / whatever and receives a point for Body / Mind / Spirit. They can then pick where to put said stat point within that category. So if you get a Mind stat you get to pick whether you want to put in int / mem / wis but you can't put it in another category.

    Stats
    Body:
    Strength
    Dexterity
    ??? (Endurance?)

    Mind:
    Intelligence
    ??? (Memory?)
    ??? (Wisdom?)

    Spirit:
    Intuition
    ??? (Will?)
    ??? (Vitality?)

    I'm debating how to fill those out.

    Vitality - Basically how quickly you heal/recover - could be in Body or Spirit (if Endurance is Body this should be Spirit)
    Endurance - Basically how sturdy / resistant to damage you are - could be in Body (obvious choice)
    Wisdom - Typically in Mind but could also be in Spirit
    Will - Basically how stubborn you are, goes in Spirit, could also be another name here depending
    Memory - goes in Mind most likely - intelligence is how quickly your mind works and memory is how well you retain information

    I want to avoid Charisma or else redefine it as people seeming to naturally like you - the instincts associated with it go hand in hand with Intuition as I define it, which is a combination of Luck/Charisma/Intuition from more traditional sources.

    Ideas on how to fill out the ??? apart from my thoughts?

    Skills
    There are also skills - you can have an option for a Skill after meeting requirements.
    You can have up to 6 skills.
    Skills can be combined into higher tiered skills to free up new spots.
    You can choose to accept or reject a skill.

    Examples (made up on the spot as I haven't engaged with this part yet):
    Requires Walk barefoot in nature for 100 km to unlock - earth connection - increases speed while barefoot by 10%
    Requires Strength stat at 15+ and attack something with intent to damage - Power Slam - increases strength by 20% for 10 seconds, can be used once per hour
    Requires Successfully create an artwork beyond your current skill level - nimble hands - dexterity +5%

    Etc. Then they can be combined to create more powerful skills. So you don't want to end up with 6 skills that you have no idea how to combine into better ones, as you won't be able to learn more. Most people will plan ahead to avoid this issue before accepting skills, but people get the 'system' as young teens so sometimes it's a mess.

    Again, I haven't really overthought those yet. But everyone can have 6 skills and they will often plan which ones to get based on known combinations to free up more slots.

    Perks
    If you are offered a skill three times and reject it you get an associated perk.

    For example, if you are working fast food but don't intend to do that for a living, you might repeatedly be offered a skill associated with it. After rejecting it three times you might get a skill that is associated with a "I'm good at it but don't like it" aspect.

    In my story a teen has the "Parentification" perk after having declined skills related to taking care of numerous younger siblings repeatedly.

    Decline a sprinting skill three times and you might get a "Reluctant Runner" perk, which gives a minor bonus to runspeed. But you will never be offered the better skill that could be combined with others ever again, etc, nor will you be offered any other skill that might result in the same perk.

    Perks are unlimited, but since you can't 'grow' them into more and more powerful skills people don't typically aim for them.

    Another note:
    Stats can decline but they will never go under double the starting value. Kids get stats/system/whatever starting around age 13-14. So basically once you've doubled your starting values you won't decline below that, but if you neglect training you'll drop if you've gone even further - albeit you lose stats more slowly as you go. Stats are re-earned faster up to a previous high.

    Thoughts?

    This is a system for a currently planned single YA book, but I like the concept well enough I'd consider it for a larger LitRPG story, or even a sequel.
     
  13. Gengar

    Gengar Polymagus ~ Prestige ~ DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2009
    Messages:
    1,867
    High Score:
    6005
    This will be a longn', but should be fun!

    For Body, I think I've mentioned before that Dex =/= Agility, and I feel the latter is more important of a stat than the former. I'm not sure how much you want to bloat that category, but:

    • Strength (obvious what it represents, but could also roll damage resistance into it. Logically speaking, it's one's strength IRL that dictates how much you're hurt by physical damage)
    • Endurance (stamina, how long you can run for etc)
    • Agility (how nimble and in control of your body you are. Dancing, acrobatics, parkour etc)
    • Dexterity (how skillful you are with your hands. Archery, Jewelcrafting, musician etc)
    I'm not sure you need a 'recovery' stat. I'd even go as far as to nerf it into the ground to put a higher emphasis on healers and healing abilities.

    Mind is one that's always troubled me because I inherently cringe at a number representing someone's IQ/Intellect. How do you even quantify that? What does it even mean? Even if you were to simplify it, how does it work? Can you learn as much as you want, but find yourself up against an artificial wall when someone tries to teach you something new because your Int isn't high enough? Maybe if your Int isn't high enough, you'll just randomly forget things and not even know what you've forgotten a la Neville?

    I don't mind Mind stats increasing your 'connection' with the systems, if you get what I mean. You've already set out a system for it to be linked. Skills. Maybe a higher Intellect stat allows for you to slot more skills, and maybe magic based classes need more skills to be effective, thus their reliance on the stat?

    Maybe Intelligence can increase the number of skills you can 'slot' and Wisdom increases their effectiveness? (all classes should benefit from Int and Wisdom to some extent, so this ticks that box too).

    Obviously, this is only if you mind -like I do - quantifying intellectual stats. I read a book recently where the character started with 0 Int and, while he was mentally able to articulate like normal, he could only communicate like an infant. It felt wrong and forced to me.

    Moving on, I think Perception is a good third Mind stat. Maybe this manifests and you being more likely to pick up on environmental/ social queues and maybe the system aids you if you have a high stat by highlighting things. Tracks being highlighted, a feeling of 'wrongness' if you're being lied to that increases in severity the higher the stat etc.

    Spirit is a bit easier to nail down I think. Will is a good one. Resisting mind altering effects and the like etc.

    I think the stat that governs Mana regeneration probably belongs here? (hard to say without knowing how magic works in your world). Could call it Soul or Energy?

    If you wanna fuck with alignments, you could do a Karma stat that can go in the negative that can affect how you're received by the correspondingly aligned factions.

    Something like 'Faith' could also be a stat here that governs your relationship with 'Gods' if they're a thing, The higher this stat, the more divine power your god gives you etc.

    Skills
    I really like what you've lined out here. Not much more to add, honestly. You can have a lot of fun coming up with ways to unlock these skills, and even more fun with finding out ways your characters can create some unique (OP, because you know damn well that's what we'd all do) combinations to free up more slots. I think this system is actually fun enough to do a lot of the heavy lifting systems wise. Great idea!

    Perks are a funny idea but will probably get a little difficult to keep track of and manage, lol. You could probably use this as comic relief to be honest. I'm sure every teenager (and writer) would have the Habitual Procrastinator perk.


    This is a good solid start. Interesting to see where you take it.
     
  14. Thaumologist

    Thaumologist Dark Lord

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2011
    Messages:
    1,960
    Location:
    Wrexham, Wales
    I like the premise - it sounds like a setting wide system, and one that people who live in have an actual plan for dealing with, which is always nice.

    So a bunch of thoughts on this. Not necessarily questions for you to answer in thread, but things to think about for writing it.

    Stats
    :

    I like symmetry in stats, or some form of mechanic to abstract them as a venn diagram. Splitting into Body (meat vehicle), Mind (Meat-based driver), Soul (non-Meat-based driver) works for this, and giving each of them three stats works for this, but consider if there's a way to have the 'same' stat across the three regions.

    Alternatively, you could have seven - a Body, Mind, Soul, Body/Mind, Body/Soul, Mind/Soul, All. I don't know what you'd want them to be, but it gives a starting place.

    Exalted (White Wolf RPG system) has
    Physical: Strength, Dexterity, Stamina
    Social: Charisma, Manipulation, Appearance
    Mental: Perception, Intelligence, Wits

    They can be vaguely broken down into "the one you attack with", "how well you attack with it", and "base defence"; although it doesn't work quite as well in practice, and they only line up because the designers forced them to.

    I really like that you get semi-free points. It avoids people doing a massive single stat, but it still ends up with lopsided builds based on quests.

    Skills:

    Why six? This doesn't seem linked to the number of stats, or the number of categories. Having it be "3, 6, 9" sort of works, but at the same point, doesn't seem like a massively intuitive reason.

    I'm assuming you can't overwrite a skill? Does this mean that you would automatically reject offers of a seventh skill, or just not get them? Because that will have an impact on whether people take the sixth skill, and thus still get perks, or don't, and never get perks again. In which case, there might be a stigma in accepting six skills before ~25, as it implies usage of the skills is needed, giving rise to a class system, and not in a fighter/wizard way.

    How many skills can you combine? At once? Was it designed to maximise consolidation, or not?
    If one person has 'Sprint', 'Jog', and 'Rowing' as three of their skills (for whatever reason), do they combine Spring and Jog into '2-Running', or any two into '2-Cardio'? Could they combine all three into '3-Cardio' which would be better?

    If one person has '2-Cardio' from Sprint and Jog, and then gains 'Swimming', could they combine this to "level up" 2-Cardio into 3-Cardio; or would it become '3-Athelete'?

    Could '2-Cardio' be combined with '2-Strength' to form '4-Athlete'? Would this be better or worse than combining '3-Cardio' with 'Football' to form '4-Athlete'?



    How well recorded are the skills, timetables, and skill trees? Do people deliberately go and join the swimming team for six months to get a perk for holding their breath, or the skill, and then tend to leave? Is there a 'Ministry of the Statsheet' that helps people pick which skills to consolidate and refine, and find work to pick up anything else they might want to round themselves off?

    Is there a reward system put in place by the government/local nobles/village head, for providing info on skill combine/declines, or is the ruling class okay with the status quo, and publishes 'self-help' documentation on how to get the best skills (in a similar manner to Xianxia Cultivation Manuals, where some might be trained in an easy, albeit not massively powerful, skill tree)? You mention people plan around getting the six skills through known combinations, so I'm assuming there's at least some form of information being spread, but how wide is it?


    Can you combine perks? If you get 'reluctant runner' and 'reluctant swimmer', can they be combined into 'reluctant cardio', or is that too good? Is there a limit to the number of perks you can get? Can they overlap - if I get a perk to make me a better runner, and a perk to improve my breathing (I dunno), do the perks interact with each other?
     
  15. Reign

    Reign Fourth Year

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2008
    Messages:
    124
    Gender:
    Male
    I'm assuming the one aspect you want feedback on is the names for the three modifier characteristics in each category.

    I'd say forget trying to label each modifier until you get a more defined idea of its use in story. The modifiers name shouldn't matter to much as its usage in story will give much more clarification then what any single word can do. Also, don't be afraid of adding your own spin to a characteristic as that can add novelty to an otherwise generic LitRPG.

    As for your skills/perk system I haven't seen that twist used (declining skills ='s Perks), so you already have +1 to the novelty score there.
     
  16. Hawkin

    Hawkin Chief Warlock

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2011
    Messages:
    1,442
    Location:
    QC, Canada
    I have to ask, as having no interest in reading a LitRPG, what is the appeal? What makes a LitRPG an interesting read?
     
  17. Gengar

    Gengar Polymagus ~ Prestige ~ DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2009
    Messages:
    1,867
    High Score:
    6005
    For me, the same joys I get out of playing an RPG, but vicariously living it through the protagonist.

    LitRPG are becoming less of a 'genre' for me though, and more of a style or perspective. They're just fantasy books to me now, where there's a problem introduced, and I enjoy 'gaming' the solution to it with the protagonists.

    Pure escapism.
     
  18. Ched

    Ched Da Trek Moderator DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2009
    Messages:
    7,853
    Location:
    The South
    It's just a sub-genre of Fantasy to me, like Urban Fantasy or High Fantasy. I think the appeal for a lot of folks (maybe myself?) in this sub-genre is the clear sense of progression that can be measured against the rest of the world.

    Take the example below:

    MC wakes up one morning and the world has changed - magic exists! A series of lucky (or unlucky) circumstances lead to him being ahead of the curve on Earth, so he emerges as a leader. As time goes on he gets more and more powerful, and it turns out that maybe his fortuitous circumstances at the start were a result of someone behind the scenes (intentional meddling or not).

    There are enemies to fight on Earth, and they need to be more powerful than the MC for the story to progress in an interesting manner. So he has to keep ahead of the curve (and the rest of humanity) to take those on. But then it's not just Earth that's involved here, there's an entire multiverse of people a step above that. And probably people a step above THAT.

    Without the LitRPG aspects in a traditional Fantasy it can be a pain in the ass to show a believable progression from "talented youth" to "supreme badass of the Multiverse." We don't typically think in terms of the world working that way and suspension of disbelief can pop up real often. Even in a regular Fantasy with humans, you still don't go from "I ran track in High School" to "I can now break the sound barrier when I run" in two years.

    But the LitRPG makes stats / skills part of the world itself. So if you need to run faster you put points into Dex (or whatever) and if you want to be stronger you put points into Str. You want to be a mage you learn a skill for that (usually) and then train it so that your fireball is better than others. The best LitRPGs make this progression about more than just "I learned skill yay" but require you to unlock the ability to learn the skill or require you to practice with it to upgrade it, etc. Maybe you combine some of your skills to take a level in badass that way, but there's always some new height to aspire to.

    Or maybe there are just more mini-goals - instead of "I need to make my fireball bigger let's do a training montage" in a traditional story, or else skipping the montage, you might get "I can unlock better fireball options if I get my INT to 50 and raise my Minor Fireball skill to max, so I need to work on that." It adds concrete goals in some cases, rather than simple "I will practice so that this gets better."

    I feel like half of what LitRPGs do is make the character power progression more straightforward, so they are constantly powering up and learning new things and taking on new challenges at new levels, which sometimes leads to politics or whatever else. It smooths the suspension of disbelief, maybe, for stories of this scope?

    You can do all of that in another fantasy genre but it's harder, imo.
     
  19. Hawkin

    Hawkin Chief Warlock

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2011
    Messages:
    1,442
    Location:
    QC, Canada
    You both make it sound like the reader has a say in the character's progression. Is that the case?
     
  20. Ched

    Ched Da Trek Moderator DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2009
    Messages:
    7,853
    Location:
    The South
    No not at all - not sure how I implied that.

    Edit - I guess I can see how I implied it. I used "you" because I was talking about a generic story as if I was talking about writing a regular novel that a person like you or me was in, I might say "so you're there in the world and you have to figure things out, and you start off by picking up a sword and hitting a tree" etc. as opposed to the bits about stats.

    I concede that I should have used MC instead of "you" there though.
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2021 at 10:41 PM
Loading...