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HP Questions that don't deserve their own thread V2

Discussion in 'Fanfic Discussion' started by Sesc, Oct 22, 2014.

  1. Silirt

    Silirt Headmaster DLP Supporter

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    They have landed lords and ladies, so I always assumed there were rustic wizards growing and harvesting food with magic.
     
  2. LucyInTheSkye

    LucyInTheSkye Second Year

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    Isn't that more fanon? The Malfoys were landed gentry courtesy of muggle royalty, but other than that there aren't any landed gentry, and Lord Voldemort is the only one using that title in the canon wizrding world, right?

    But good shout about the landowning thing, maybe some wizards do own and cultivate a lot of land and that's where most of the produce sold in wizarding Britain comes from, unless they just obliviate and steal from muggle farmers.
     
  3. Mordecai

    Mordecai Drunken Scotsman ~ Prestige ~ DLP Supporter

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    There's no canon explanation to go to on this.

    Logically it would make sense that many wizards wouldn't live in muggle cities. Its always going to be easier to keep the secret if you have a bit of space and distance from muggles, and living out in the countryside comes with access to large gardens. Magic likely removes a lot of the physical labour from gardening, so it becomes reasonably easy to farm a bit for your family.

    Certainly we know that the Weasley's have an orchard behind their house, which suggests they're growing fruit for themselves and maybe to trade with friends and neighbours who grow other things?

    There's probably a shop in Hogsmeade and one in Diagon Alley, run by guys who largely go round everyone they know that grows things and buy their surplus; have a handful of suppliers who deliberately farm larger amounts to sell them; and the rest probably obtained discretely from muggles (either for payment or via obliviation).
     
  4. Prometheus VII

    Prometheus VII First Year

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    JK never shows us a non-good-guy family-home IC. The only wizarding family we meet in any detail are the Weasleys. I must admit, I’ve never been sure if they’re supposed to be the country bumpkins of the wizarding world or not.
     
  5. Mordecai

    Mordecai Drunken Scotsman ~ Prestige ~ DLP Supporter

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    Definitely in terms of the style of their home, I could see them being a bit bumpkinish. But I think the logic of living in the countryside is quite strong. The more isolated you are, the easier it is to hide your magic whilst still being able to use it. And even more so with kids causing accidental magic. The more remote you are, the fewer obliviations are necessary.

    And since travel time or remoteness are definitely non-issues in the wizarding world, there's no downside to a nice remote home.
     
  6. Sesc

    Sesc Slytherin at Heart Moderator

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    There is not (apart from Hagrid's pumpkin patch). In fact, the lack is so strinking that you have to wonder whether everyone doesn't grow their own food: There is not a single reference to any place where you could buy basic foods, as opposed to meals.

    The most direct reference is possibly this:
    You see how oblique that is.

    So that's my canonical most-likely scenario. On the other hand, if you do the maths, you don't need that much of an infrastructure either. One moderately sized farm by contemporary standards is enough to supply the needed food, and that's before you factor in magic. So if you wanted to, Malfoy owning land and having tenants would be enough to produce corn (BE) for everyone.
     
  7. Prometheus VII

    Prometheus VII First Year

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    At a certain point, you have to wonder how in the world money even circulates in the magical world. Even if their population is less than 10,000. Their GDP has to be nothing compared to the wealth of, say, the wealthiest 10% of wizarding society. Estate tax, anyone?
     
  8. lopeck

    lopeck Seventh Year

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    And yet there is Diagon Alley, Grimmauld Place and a bunch of magical folks living in Godrics Holow. While there are remote places that are wholly wizard owned, that seems to be the exception. Most just seem to live in the same place their ancestors lived in, regardless of muggle towns or cities around them growing and changing.
     
  9. Mordecai

    Mordecai Drunken Scotsman ~ Prestige ~ DLP Supporter

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    Diagon Alley is an effectively sealed area that is safe away from prying muggle eyes. Grimmauld place is a single house, owned by a family who (from what we can tell by their attitudes) likely never interacted with the muggles around them. Godrics Hollow is an interesting one. I'd personally say a small village with multiple magical families is a hell of a lot less risky to the statute of secrecy than, for example, a big suburb with a single magical family who interact with the muggles around them regularly.
     
  10. Blorcyn

    Blorcyn Minister of Magic DLP Supporter DLP Silver Supporter

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    Hmmm. Do they? We know that there was a Malfoy Sir, at some point, but it was quietly swept away as too muggle, and while it’s a title it’s not a peerage. They don’t have Princes, and we never actually see a Lord or Lady, do we? Beyond Voldemort as an affectation, whose parentage we know.

    Is it WoG?
     
  11. Silirt

    Silirt Headmaster DLP Supporter

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    The idea that they have Lordship rings and designated seats on the Wizengamot is fanon, but it always seemed like a decent extrapolation. The society depicted just seemed aristocratic. Lucius flexing by raising peacocks on his estate is really the only insight we have into what he does with the land around the manor, but generally when you're as obsessed with genealogy and purity as the Malfoys and the Blacks, you'd think there would be some property to inherit. That was the motivation behind all the arranged marriages and maintaining purity in the real life aristocracy, the consolidation of wealth and the continuation of the landed class.
     
  12. Sesc

    Sesc Slytherin at Heart Moderator

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    None of that is Canon. Not even the Wizengamot as anything other than a sporadic high court is Canon. This is not really a point of contention. As far as Canon goes, the situation is perfectly clear.

    At any rate, I suppose OP's question has been answered.
     
  13. Prometheus VII

    Prometheus VII First Year

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    Can you use Wingardium Leviosa to levitate enchantments that have a physical component (the mist in the maze, for example)? If we define magic as an being an object — or we say that once it’s been cast it has a physical property — then, yes, theoretically you could. But that’s all speculation.

    To be more specific: if you cast a color changing charm on a feather, is it (a) a magical-feather, meaning you can’t levitate the color separately from the feather because it’s still a feather, or (b) a feather-with-magic, meaning the magic that alters the feather is a property you can manipulate?

    Are there any instances of this happening IC? Is there anything stated that contradicts this idea?
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2020
  14. Sesc

    Sesc Slytherin at Heart Moderator

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    Charms change properties of objects. As such, a blue feather is not different from a red feather, and you can levitate either.

    In terms of seeing this: If you generalise to using charms on charmed objects, I'm sure you'll find a ton of examples in the books. What comes to mind is e.g. a broomstick, which is stated to have several charms (e.g. braking charm/PoA, or a cushioning charm/QttA), one of which is also a flying charm:

    “What’s that Weasley’s riding?” Malfoy called in his sneering drawl. “Why would anyone put a flying charm on a mouldy old log like that?” (OotP)

    Naturally, the whole of the broom flies -- and it's also the whole of the broom that gets summoned (GoF).

    Nothing's saying you can't make it complicated, though. For FF it's a reasonable enough assumption that charms may interfere with one another, and if you don't know what you're doing, it's not working, or you're getting unexpected side effects.


    Edit: As for the mist, it might be different. I can't think of an instance that shows an equivalent example either way. What I would remark, though, is that magic is rarely binary. We see gradual results all the time. So perhaps, on account of the mist being ... well, mist, and not very substantial, a satisfying result keeping in line with Canon would be the Levitation Charm working ... just very, very badly. The mist (and this would be the same for actual, natural mist, too) gets lifted only a couple of inches.
     
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