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Questions about YOUR FANFIC that don't deserve their own thread...

Discussion in 'Fanfic Discussion' started by Ched, Aug 3, 2013.

  1. Sorrows

    Sorrows Unspeakable Prestige DLP Gold Supporter

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    @Sesc It's been a very long time since I've been to the Tower of London but from what I remember you walk through a bunch of information rooms and the vault doors are just before the shiny treasure so probably at 5. Don't take my word for it though. Also there is a long line of crowns and assorted jewels with a moving conveyer belt like walkway in what is probably Treasury. Room 2.

    Oh yeah @Sesc. For a full run down watch the movie Johnny English. Especially if you are writing a break-in. The security of the crown jewels is extensively covered by MI5's finest agent. :)
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2017
  2. Sesc

    Sesc Slytherin at Heart Moderator

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    I'm at odds with myself how to write Dumbledore. In particular, how would he act if there was suspicion a student attacked another student quite severely, but there is no proof? And in theory it could have been anyone, really?

    Imagine the suspect in his office -- the wand examined, with negative results -- what's the atmosphere? How does Dumbledore act? What does he say? Ask, to force a lie (if it is one)? Never ask directly at all, just his Dumbledorish-apparently-random-but-not-really stuff to figure it out in a different way (how)? What?

    Toss me some ideas :(
     
  3. Miner

    Miner High Inquisitor

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    I think we all have an image of Dumbledore being super into "second chances" and seeing the best in people. I'd suspect that he wouldn't do anything to the suspect immediately, but quietly behind the scenes he'd set up multiple ways to watch the student carefully to ascertain whether or not he/she was actually guilty.

    And even if he/she was, I don't think he'd do anything direct about it; more like he'd try to figure out his/her motives and then see if maybe he can bring his/her way of thinking around to the point where it wouldn't happen again.

    I kind of just get the sense that Dumbledore isn't super confrontational about this kind of thing. Like, Dumbledore doesn't even do anything to Malfoy despite having pretty definitive knowledge of him injuring other students while trying to murder him.
     
  4. wordhammer

    wordhammer Supreme Mugwump DLP Supporter

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    Dumbledore has been watching students grow up and grow into their powers for decades, and he has a keen insight to motivations and behavior. If he suspects someone but has no proof, I think he'd gently intimidate the student or students to understand the motivations and such. He'd let the student's own guilt and discomfort with the drastic action they've taken bubble to the surface. I don't think he'd ever act like he wasn't sure what was really going on, except in the most bland and unbelievable way.

    It isn't necessary for him to seek proof, so much as to explain or eliminate the factors that don't fit into his understanding of the situation. As headmaster, he can take all sorts of actions based upon suspicions, but what he chooses to do usually has more to do with guiding students to grow into taking responsibility for their actions.
     
  5. Sesc

    Sesc Slytherin at Heart Moderator

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    Interesting take, @wordhammer. On the face of it, I see a few issues with this -- if he really isn't sure, then what would talking about the issue be useful for? Finding out motivations etc. presupposes the student has motivations, because he is the culprit. But if he isn't, there's nothing to find out, and Dumbledore just, in a roundabout way, accused an innocent student of something quite severe. Somehow, I can't picture him that way.

    I keep going back to Riddle and the Chamber and Myrtle, but unfortunately, we never see how exactly Dumbledore confronts him about it -- if he ever even does (and, of course, he was just an ordinary teacher then). But take Riddle either way, just as an example -- what would a (hypothetical) Headmaster Dumbledore do?

    Riddle is in his office, for something or another, possibly unrelated (I doubt Dumbledore would ever cite him there in the first place, without concrete proof), and then Dumbledore says or does ... what?

    Edit: Hah @Taure, that's bad cop, good cop, but what if Dumbledore hasn't got Harry around to bulldoze people with accusations? :p
     
  6. Taure

    Taure Magical Core Enthusiast Prestige DLP Supporter

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    You might take inspiration from how Dumbledore confronts Lucius Malfoy at the end of CoS, where he had no proof.

     
  7. deyas

    deyas Slug Club Member

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    I think that's one part of his characterization that often gets sold short in fanfiction, even in fanfic where he's otherwise written well: Dumbledore was not above thinly veiled threats, as Taure shows above, or even very direct threats mixed with a touch of bravado, if you look at his encounter with the Aurors in book 6(??).
     
  8. Sorrows

    Sorrows Unspeakable Prestige DLP Gold Supporter

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    I have a question. What was/would be on Lupin's curriculum? I remember Boggets, Warewolves and Grindylows suggesting he focused on magical creatures, I think Hermione lists a few more at one point. What else do you think he was likely to teach about?
     
  9. ScottPress

    ScottPress The Horny Sovereign Prestige

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    I think the book mentioned kelpies as well. Generally Defense Against Dangerous Creatures. Snape tossed in werewolves, but I don't know if Lupin would have covered that topic himself. You could add vampires, quintapeds, the Ilvermorny House symbols. Steal from FB too. Erupment (erumpent?), occamy. At some point it just becomes Hagrid's Care of Magical Monsters, though.
     
  10. theimmortalhp

    theimmortalhp Second Year

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    At least Boggarts, Hinkypunks, Grindylows, Werewolves, Kappas, Red Caps, and Vampires. Possibly more. Grindylows, Red Caps, Hinkypunks, and Boggarts were on his final.

    In Care of Magical Creatures Hagrid taught them about Hippogriffs, Flobberworms, and Salamanders (the flaming kind). I imagine the difference comes out in the "dark nature" of the creature. The ones they cover in DADA will seek out humans whereas the ones in CoMC are just regular creatures (sometimes dangerous to humans, but not humans in particular).
     
  11. Faun

    Faun Second Year

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    Try to see it from the student's point of view and take things from your own experiences. While I have never grievously injured anyone, but whenever I have done something I shouldn't have on being confronted by an adult in authority (my parents or a teacher) I have in most cases when I am certain that lying might not work confessed, shown contrition and begged for forgiveness. This always happened under the belief that lying wouldn't help and honesty might get me rewarded with leniency.

    In the wizarding world when a wave of wand is all it takes to fix most things, in a student's mind the belief that Dumbledore can fix everything with ease is not farfetched. All Dumbledore needs to do is somehow convince the student that he already knows everything and is willing to be lenient should the student demonstrate contrition and honesty.
     
  12. Sesc

    Sesc Slytherin at Heart Moderator

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    Thanks for the reply, but that doesn't work. Even leaving aside that I'm not sure how average (and hence, useful as an example) I am (yadda yadda confessing to exactly as much as could be proven, coming up with a spin that gave a positive light, walking out with them almost apologising for punishing me), the situation here definitely isn't. Hence why I asked about Riddle -- do you think he would have responded that way, when asked about Myrtle? Or, for that matter, if no one could prove (and some didn't even believe) it was Riddle, how would they possibly go about confronting or accusing the star student of Hogwarts?

    Ultimately, the question is, of course, which way do I want to write Dumbledore and the situation, but the problem is that I haven't really nailed down his character enough to get an idea of which ways I could write this.
     
  13. Faun

    Faun Second Year

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    If it's someone like Riddle he won't confess. Riddle was methodical and confident in his ability to get away. He even had a fall guy set up to get away. In fact Riddle always set up someone more probable to take the blame. Dumbledore is good at reading situations, but even he could never pin down Riddle.

    As far as how you want to write Dumbledore goes, you will need to consider the totality of his character and it's impact on the plot.
    In canon, when Dumbledore found Riddle's trophies he offered a mild rebuke and a warning to desist from like behaviour in Hogwarts. During the CoS incident while he suspected Riddle's involvement and kept an eye on him afterwards, Dumbledore didn't confront Riddle or ever tried to set the record straight for Hagrid.
    Dumbledore as the Headmaster continued with the same behaviour pattern. Sirius faced no consequences for putting Snape's life in jeopardy. Hagrid got away with keeping a dragon. Draco got away with attempted murder. Contrast this with his approach in dealing with adults like Fudge, Voldemort, Umbridge and Malfoy, you get thinly and not so thinly veiled threats and displays of power.

    So if you want to keep his character true to canon, there isn't much to be done if he is dealing with a student.

    A possible approach is a more proactive Dumbledore who is willing to confront his students. A lack of evidence and a student like Riddle will give you something similar to what happened in canon after the CoS incident, but it effects other events. Sirius, Malfoy, Snape, Hagrid etc. wouldn't be able to get away with their brand of BS.

    A more heavy handed Dumbledore can coerce the student in confessing by shear force of personality. Even Riddle feared Dumbledore. Given that there are no Rights of the Accused and Juveniles in conflict of law in the magical world, Dumbledore will be able to get away with it.
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2018
  14. Joe's Nemesis

    Joe's Nemesis High Score: 2,058 Prestige

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    Quick language question.

    I'm trying to find a French phrase that someone would say in frustration to someone else. Something along the lines of "Damn it!" or "you're pissing me off!"

    What I've found is "Tu m'emmerdes." From the searches I've done, it looks as though that translates to "You're annoying (me)" or "you're a pain in the ass" or "Your bothering me." One place said "pissing me off."

    Also, the phrase should be something that while it might not be said in polite company, it also wouldn't make a typical twenty-something blink if they heard it at a bar. Any ideas?

    Or, would "Vous me faites chier!" work better?
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2018
  15. Sorrows

    Sorrows Unspeakable Prestige DLP Gold Supporter

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    merde - shit both common and versitile
    Zut is probably the equivalent of darn
    fais chier / ça me fait chier – that pisses me off (ruder than the translation suggests)
    C’est des conneri - this is bullshit
    Et chiottes - slang for toilet, used for damn in Paris
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2018
  16. Microwave

    Microwave Sixth Year

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    Sorrows has already listed some, but might as well just post the ones i've already listed.

    I tend to just say « merde », which means shit, or « putain » which means fuck as quick expletives.

    Some common phrases are:
    « fais chier » : it's shit
    « oh la vache » : holy shit, or oh cow literally
    « zut » : damn
    « casse-toi » , « dégage » : fuck off
    « ta guele » : shut up but very rude
     
  17. Joe's Nemesis

    Joe's Nemesis High Score: 2,058 Prestige

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    Thanks @Sorrows and @Microwave

    The context is Ron (as a student), talking to Fleur (as a professor), and what he says pisses off Fleur, who is concerned for him. Fleur isn't trying to be rude, but she's expressing quite a bit of frustration, enough that it makes her slip back into French for a moment.
     
  18. Sorrows

    Sorrows Unspeakable Prestige DLP Gold Supporter

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    Vous me faites chier - vous (when speaking to a single person) is used when talking to someone of 'higher status' or to whom you want to be polite so it seems a bit odd to say it like that to Ron while also letting slip an indelicate phrase. I would say that Fleur in general would probably use more formal french particularly in a professional setting but in a moment of frustration she would probably slip back to toi /tu

    I could see Fleur using 'tu me fatigues' which basically means your making me annoyed/tired and is less swary and more in charecter than some of the other options. For jokes you could have her say 't'es rien qu'un petit connard' which roughly means
    You really are a little asshole.
     
  19. Joe's Nemesis

    Joe's Nemesis High Score: 2,058 Prestige

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    Thanks, I think tu me fatigues might work. I'll also keep the latter in my back pocket. There's a couple of scenes it might work in later on, since my character of Fleur has a bit of an anger problem.
     
  20. Kaeling

    Kaeling Squib

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    "petit con" would be more appropriate here, it's usually what an exaspered adult would say to a cocky teenager who talks back to her. "connard" is more pejorative and rarely used alongside "petit".

    "tu me fatigues" works perfectly if you want Fleur to remain polite even if she annoyed.
     
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